heroin

University of Washington Health

At the front of a classroom, health worker Cheryll Moore demonstrates "the nod" — a jerk of the head forward and then quickly back — a telltale sign of heroin use, though not necessarily of an overdose.

"In that scenario, they can go either way," she said. "I would not leave them alone."

After an hour or so of instruction that includes spotting signs of a life-threatening overdose, the class of ordinary people — couples, co-workers, parents, retirees and others — leaves with two vials of the prescription heroin antidote naloxone, better known by its brand name, Narcan.

WMFE

Accidental deaths from drug use is up 26 percent in Orange and Osceola counties, according to the medical examiner’s office.

Heroin overtook cocaine as the deadliest street drug last year. Heroin was found in 89 deaths in Orange and Osceola counties last year, that’s compared to 19 heroin-related deaths in 2011.

Cocaine was a close second, with 88 deaths, and was often used in combination with other drugs. That’s an 89 percent increase from 2012.

University of Washington Health

For more than 40 years, there’s been a drug that can stop a heroin overdose in its tracks, if someone gives the drug in time.  

And it turns out that the same drug works for patients who overdose on prescription painkillers such as morphine or OxyContin --drugs called opiods because they mimic the action of opium.

Patient advocates say many deaths from accidental overdoses of prescription painkillers or heroin could be averted simply and at little expense if there were wider distribution of a drug the drug called nalaxone,  or its better known brand name of Narcan.

New laws and a continued crackdown on corrupt doctors helped reduce Florida’s prescription drug deaths significantly a few years ago. However, a new plague has broken out and needs to be addressed as well, the Orlando Sentinel editorial board reports.

A new report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse says that a heroin “epidemic” is growing in South Florida, citing an increase in deaths. Public-health officials worry that teen-agers and young adults who are shooting the drug are too young to remember the spread of HIV and other diseases through shared needles.

Heroin Roars Back Now That Pills Scarce

Feb 16, 2013

One indication that the crackdown on pill mills is working is that opiod pills like oxycodone are now harder to find and a lot more expensive than heroin, Nicole Brochu reports in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

With Mexican drug cartels competing with Colombians to supply the Florida heroin market, the heroin is purer and cheaper than in the past, law enforcement officers say. They're calling for more treatment.

Pages