Heat

When Shakira Franklin drives from West Baltimore to her job near the city's Inner Harbor, she can feel the summer heat ease up like a fist loosening its grip.

"I can actually feel me riding out of the heat. When I get to a certain place when I'm on my way, I'll turn off my air and I'll roll my windows down," says Franklin. "It just seems like the sun is beaming down on this neighborhood."

It’s the middle of August in Florida, which means we should be accustomed to the sweltering, suffocating heat we’ve been sweating through across the Tampa Bay area – especially since the end of last week.

But if you been thinking these oppressive conditions feel just a bit worse than normal, you’re right.

It turns out that Sunday’s heat levels broke records in some parts of the region, and this trend will continue at least for the next couple of days.

A report released this week predicts a lot more days of extreme heat - so much that they're being called "killer heat" days. We conclude our three-part series with a plea from scientists for politicians to do something - before it's too late.

As Temperatures Climb, A New Push To Keep Workers Safe

Jul 16, 2019
Sun in the sky with white clouds
Mediengestalter / Pixabay

By Anna Maria Barry-Jester / Kaiser Health News

Last month, on a day that was sweltering even by Phoenix standards, Filiberto Lares knew he wasn’t well. An airline caterer, he said he had spent hours moving between the scalding tarmac and a truck with no air conditioning. Lares, 51, was dehydrated and fell ill with a fever that would keep him out of work for four unpaid days. It wasn’t the first time this had happened. 

A report released Tuesday says that the nation will face extremely hot days - along with deaths from killer heat waves - in the near future if carbon emissions aren't reduced. And perhaps not surprisingly, Florida may experience some of its hottest days on record.

Health insurers that treat millions of seniors have overcharged Medicare by nearly $30 billion over the past three years alone, but federal officials say they are moving ahead with long-delayed plans to recoup at least part of the money.