health care marketplace

It's time for consumers who buy their own health insurance to start shopping for policies for next year. Open enrollment for Affordable Care Act coverage starts Thursday across most of the country.

But the shopping and buying experience will vary widely, depending on where people live.

In California, for example, where political leaders have always been supportive of the Affordable Care Act, legislators have allocated $100 million for outreach.

WMFE

Companies offering insurance on Florida’s health care marketplace are increasing individual premiums by $208 dollars a month on average next year.

HealthCare.gov

After a computer glitch got patched up, supporters of President Barack Obama's health care law were out in force Sunday trying to get uninsured people signed up by the official deadline for 2015 coverage.

The effort had the trappings of a get-out-the-vote drive, with email reminders, telephone calls and squads of community-level volunteers.

"You can't avoid it: TV, radio, church, wife, kids, co-workers," said Ramiro Hernandez, a previously uninsured truck repair shop owner who enrolled himself and his family in Joliet, Illinois, on Saturday.

More than 1.3 million Floridians have signed up for health insurance through the federal marketplace so far under the Affordable Care Act.

Federal health officials said Wednesday that about 57 percent are part of the nearly 1 million who are re-enrolling and 43 percent selected a plan for the first time. About 32 percent were under the age of 35.

The second enrollment period started in November and ends Feb. 15. Consumers can sign up in person, call the government hotline or go online. Those who don't sign up during that time may have to wait until next year.

GOP Not Slowing FL Obamacare Enrollment

Feb 3, 2015

When Florida workers promoting President Barack Obama's health care marketplace want instant feedback, they go to an online "heat map." The map turns darker green where they've seen the most people and shows bright red dots for areas where enrollment is high.

"The map shows us where the holes are" and what communities need to be targeted next, said Lynn Thorp, regional director of the Health Planning Council of Southwest Florida. She hands out information about the health care marketplace at rodeos, farmers markets, hockey games and almost any place where people gather.