guns in schools

Empty classroom with chalkboard on wall
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The Florida Department of Education was unable to confirm an independent survey that found seven of the state’s 67 school districts have approved or would consider arming classroom teachers under a controversial school “guardian” program. 

The commission that's directing the Florida Legislature's response to the Parkland shooting will recommend that public school teachers be allowed to be armed.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission voted 13-1 on Wednesday evening to suggest that lawmakers expand a state law that now allows some school staff to carry guns but excludes people who are primarily classroom teachers.

JESSICA BAKEMAN / WLRN

President Donald Trump's proposal to arm teachers in the wake of the Parkland school shooting has met with opposition from many teachers and students, but Polk County's sheriff created a program doing just that two years ago.

Southeastern University adopted Sheriff Grady Judd's "Sentinel Program" in 2016, offering 132 hours of training so teachers or faculty could become special sheriff's deputies and legally carry concealed weapons on campus.

Webber International University also adopted the program but so far they are the only institutions that have bitten.

Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran says the state’s pending school marshal program is the “first-of-its kind” in the nation.

And the Congressman representing Parkland said mass shootings went up 200 percent in the decade after the national assault weapons ban expired.

WUSF's Steve Newborn gets to the bottom of these claims with Allison Graves of PolitiFact Florida.

The Legislature’s new plan to arm school employees as a last line of defense to an active shooter might never get tested in Florida’s biggest school districts.

Officials in 10 of the state’s largest systems, which educate nearly 60 percent of all Florida school children, said they have no intention of giving teachers or other staff guns to carry into classrooms.

Designated people would be allowed to carry concealed firearms on school grounds under a bill added to the agenda of a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting next week.

A Florida lawmaker is trying to revive a gun bill that has already failed to pass twice during the 2018 legislative session.

Proposal Re-Emerges About Guns At Private Schools

Aug 31, 2017

Floridians with concealed-weapons licenses would be allowed to pack heat while at private schools located on the property of religious institutions, under a proposal filed Wednesday in the state House.

After several Duval students were caught with guns at school over the last two weeks, the School Board and the superintendent said Tuesday they’re working on an intervention plan.

Board Chair Paula Wright said board members have met with groups of students at each of the eight schools where guns have turned up this year.

A proposal that would allow people with concealed-weapons licenses to pack heat while hitting the books on college and university campuses notched it first two successes Wednesday.

The legislation (SB 68 and HB 4001), which won support from criminal-justice committees in the House and Senate, is widely opposed by academic leaders.

Proponents argued that the proposal would make colleges safer, while opponents questioned the need to allow weapons into an already stress-filled atmosphere.

A bill that would have allowed designated individuals to carry guns in Florida public schools for security appears to be dead for this session.

Sen. John Legg, R-Trinity and chairman of the Senate education committee, said today he’s sure the legislation (SB 180) can’t pass the Senate after his committee postponed it a second time.

A companion bill still could pass in the House, but Legg said it would violate what he called the culture of the Senate for senators to take it up after his committee’s action.