gun reform

It’s been two years since the Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school shooting that left 17 dead. Since then, the legislature has passed several laws in an attempt to prevent more gun violence. Some of the changes include arming teachers, raising the legal age to purchase guns, and removing weapons from people who police are worried might harm themselves or others--the so-called red flag law. This session, Senate President Bill Galvano (Bradenton-R) asked lawmakers to study the causes behind gun violence, but so far not a lot is happening.

Student survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High hosted a "listening party" on Wednesday evening to encourage an exchange of ideas within the school community about how to address gun violence. 

The event, which took place at a Marriott Hotel in Coral Springs, was closed to the public and media. It was, however, followed by a press conference at which the participants, many of them student group leaders at the Parkland school, opened themselves up to press.

Susana Matta Valdivieso was hiding in a dark classroom when a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

While a lot of eyes are on Tallahassee to see what the state Legislature has in store in terms of gun reforms, Florida’s U.S. Senators are also talking about what they’d like to see Congress do as well.

A Florida lawmaker is hoping the state legislature will take up a refiled gun control bill during this week’s special session.

Gun control advocates joined Florida Democrats at the Capitol Thursday, calling on the Republican-controlled legislature to hear their gun safety bills.

The Rev. Al Sharpton and the mothers of two unarmed black youths shot to death in Florida led protesters in Tallahassee Monday, as lawmakers in the House considered revamping gun laws.