government shutdown

Updated at 3:14 p.m. EST.

Joseph Daskalakis' son Oliver was born on New Year's Eve, a little over a week into the current government shutdown, and about 10 weeks before he was expected.

The prematurely born baby ended up in a specialized neonatal intensive care unit, the only one near the family's home in Lakeville, Minn., that could care for him.

As the prospect of life without a paycheck sets in for 800,000 federal employees and others affected by the ongoing government shutdown, questions are arising about health insurance and other health benefits — dental and vision coverage, and long-term care insurance.

Will shuttered agencies continue to cover benefits for employees and contractors as per usual? We've dug up some answers.

Are federal workers and their families still covered by their health plan?

Heading into the third week of the partial government shutdown, President Donald Trump told reporters outside the White House that he can relate to the pain of federal workers who aren’t receiving paychecks.

“Many of those people that won’t be receiving a paycheck, many of those people agree 100 percent with what I’m doing,” he said.

How The Federal Shutdown Is Affecting Health Programs

Jan 3, 2019

There seems to be no end in sight for the current partial government shutdown, the third since the beginning of the Trump administration.

For the vast majority of the federal government's public health efforts, though, it's business as usual.

The partial government shutdown that started Saturday will affect quite a few activities of the Food and Drug Administration.

Although most of the agency's employees weren't working over the weekend and on Monday and Tuesday because of federal holidays, FDA will furlough some 40 percent of its staff starting Wednesday.

U.S. Rep. Daniel Webster was a reluctant yes and Rep. Steve Southerland was a defiant no as 17 Florida members of Congress voted to re-open the federal government and raise the debt limit on Wednesday, and 11 said no.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio was one of the "no" votes when the Senate took action in late afternoon. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, voted yes with the majority.

With the Oct. 1 Obamacare enrollment date right around the corner, Republicans in Congress are threatening a government shutdown.  South Florida Sun-Sentinel columnist Michael Mayo argues that Republicans in both Congress and Tallahassee should give the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, a chance to prove itself before dismantling it.