fish

Florida Gulf Coast University learned late last week that it’s going to receive part of a $30 million dollar grant to fund research into the impacts gulf waters have on human health by way of the fish we eat. It’s part of a National Science Foundation grant, and FGCU will be the lead on the “Greater Caribbean Center for Ciguatera Research.” We're joined by the principal investigator for this center, Dr. Mike Parsons, who is a professor of Marine Science and is the Director of the Coastal Watershed Institute and Vester Field Station.

A study seven years in the making by University of South Florida researchers has created a map of how many species live in the Gulf of Mexico. This will give experts an idea of how much damage would take place from a future oil spill.

The Lionfish Challenge is underway, and it’s one of several efforts to rid Florida of the invasive species that has no natural predators and negatively impacts wildlife.

For many pregnant women, understanding what seafood is safe and healthy, and what should be avoided because of mercury concerns comes with a lot of hand-wringing. In part, that's because the federal government's advice on the matter, first issued in 2004, has long been criticized as unclear.

That guidance has included advice on how much seafood to eat, and which species pregnant and nursing women should avoid over concerns about mercury contamination.