exercise

Why do some people not respond to exercise? A new $170 million study funded by the National Institutes of Health will attempt to answer that question.

When Scott Carney first saw the photo of a nearly naked man sitting comfortably on a glacier in the frigid cold, he was skeptical.

The man — Wim Hof — is a Dutch athlete who claims to control his body temperature in extreme cold through sheer force of will. Exercising in the cold, Hof argues, makes people healthier.

We know we need to exercise for our health, but a lifelong exercise habit may also help us feel younger and stay stronger well into our senior years. In fact, people in their 70s who have been exercising regularly for decades seem to have put a brake on the aging process, maintaining the heart, lung and muscle fitness of healthy people at least 30 years younger.

You've likely heard the idea that sitting is the new smoking.

Compared with 1960, workers in the U.S. burn about 140 fewer calories, on average, per day due to our sedentary office jobs. And, while it's true that sitting for prolonged periods is bad for your health, the good news is that we can offset the damage by adding more physical activity to our days.

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Florida is below the national average when it comes to recommended weekly fitness goals for adults. 

Young women, especially young women of color, tend to get less exercise than their male counterparts, and the disparities worsen after high school ends.

This is the finding of a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Jacksonville would get new flashing crosswalk signals and an education campaign focused on pedestrian and cyclist safety if a couple of bills are passed by City Council.

For the last two years, the YMCA chapters in Tampa and Jacksonville have competed to see who could rack up the most miles on treadmills. They’ve each won one, so this year’s Treadmill Tuesday competition will be important for a number of reasons.

Count the number of hours you sit each day. Be honest.

"If you commute an hour in the morning and hour after work — that's two hours, and if you sit at an eight-hour-a-day desk job that's 10," says epidemiologist Loretta DiPietro of the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University.

"Then you come home at, say, 6 p.m., eat dinner and crash into your recliner for another three to four hours," says DiPietro. "That's 13 to 14 hours of sitting."

If you're involved in high school athletics, you know the scene. There's increasing pressure to specialize in a single sport and play it year-round.

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It turns out heading to the gym daily doesn’t give you a free pass to sit down the rest of the day, the New Scientist reports. According to the Mayo Clinic, there is a significant link between sitting down and premature death, even if you exercise regularly. Researchers don’t recommend giving up on exercise though. While a workout cannot undo hours of sitting, "active couch potatoes" fare better than people who sit a lot and do not go to the gym.  

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It’s much too soon to get excited -- it’s still in the mouse stage of research -- but a substance being tested by Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter and other centers seems to make obese rodents lose weight and use 5 percent more energy. All without exercise. As the New York Times describes, there are too many unanswered questions at this point to know whether such a substance might do more harm than good.

A multi-year study finds that Americans -- and Floridians -- are exercising more than in the past, yet still getting fatter. In a similar vein, we're living longer, but the extra years aren't healthy ones.

Those seemingly contradictory results, which show public health is a complicated business, emerge from a sweeping 25-year study of the nation's health published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The analysis was done by Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle.

New York Times

Studies that set out to answer the pressing question of whether walking or running offers more health benefits found that both do, but the benefits are not the same -- particularly for those who want to prevent weight gain. As the New York Times reports, a published survey of more than 15,000 walkers and 32,000 runners found that the runners were thinner than the walkers overall and maintained their smaller waistlines better over a six-year period.

Parkinson’s Patients Learning Power of Exercise

May 29, 2013

Parkinson’s disease will be diagnosed in another 60,000 Americans this year. Each one will learn that medication is critical in slowing down the incurable disorder. But the treatment won’t end there. A growing number of patients in the Tampa Bay area are finding the body and mind can benefit from another prescription - one of exercise and physical therapy.

“Keep it strong and big….Big step out. Stretch the arms….three more…one and back, two and back and last one…and three, finish. Good."

There's a lot to love about biking to work: the exercise, the fresh air, the cost savings and the benefits for the environment.

But does it make you healthier?

That's a question that's not as easy to answer as you might think. But since today is Bike to Work Day, we'll give it a try.

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NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

The numbers are pretty grim: More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia.

But here's the good news: Brain researchers say there are ways to boost brain power and stave off problems in memory and thinking.