employer-based insurance

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Don’t expect to see much relief from rising costs for workplace health coverage under a federal budget deal that postpones a widely feared tax on generous insurance plans, experts say.

Boss May Be Able To Force You To Buy Insurance

Mar 10, 2015

Under the health law, large employers that don’t offer their full-time workers comprehensive, affordable health insurance face a fine. But some employers are taking it a step further and requiring workers to buy the company insurance, whether they want it or not. Many workers may have no choice but to comply.

Some workers are not pleased. One disgruntled reader wrote to Kaiser Health News: “My employer is requiring me to purchase health insurance and is automatically taking the premium out of my paycheck even though I don’t want to sign up for health insurance. Is this legal?”

Mary Shedden/WUSF

Brooke and Andrew Lee can't imagine being without health insurance.

So for the past seven years, that's meant digging deep into the earnings of their video production agency in St. Petersburg. It’s expensive, but Brooke Lee says the alternative is worse.

“Even though costs are high, I’ve just always been somebody who has health care. And I would be really nervous… for the unknowns to happen, some major accident or health problem that would put us out of business and pretty much ruin everything we’ve worked so hard on if we didn’t have health insurance,” she said.

Brian Klepper of Atlantic Beach, CEO of the National Business Coalition on Health, says his group sees little interest among major employers to offload responsibility for employees' coverage.

So far, despite predictions that employers would embrace private exchanges, they haven't, Klepper writes. His organization's own survey of middle managers found only 5 percent have moved to private exchanges and just 8 percent think it's a possibility in the next three years.

Some Workers Could Be Auto-Enrolled

Aug 5, 2014

Newly hired employees who don’t sign up for health insurance on the job could have it done for them under a health law provision that may take effect as early as next year.

But the controversial provision is raising questions: Does automatic enrollment help employees help themselves, or does it force them into coverage they don’t want and may not need?

A group of employers, many of them retail and hospitality businesses, want the provisions repealed, but some experts say the practice has advantages and is consistent with the aims of the health law.

Health care spending for a family with a common employer-sponsored health plan has more than doubled over the past decade, according to research from the benefits consultant Milliman Inc.

A typical American family of four will spend an average of $9,695 on health care this year, according to actuarial projections in the 2014 Milliman Medical Index, which was released Wednesday.