concussions

The University of Miami’s Sports Medicine Institute concussion program is testing a medical marijuana pill for high school football players. 

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A federal judge in Connecticut has dismissed a lawsuit by 60 former professional wrestlers, many of them stars in the 1980s and 1990s, who claimed World Wrestling Entertainment failed to protect them from repeated head trauma including concussions that led to long-term brain damage.

Do Concussions Cause Parkinson’s? One Study Thinks So

Apr 25, 2018
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A study of veterans’ medical records over the past decade, found those with traumatic brain injuries had a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s Disease. 

Wikimedia Commons

The NFL's new rule outlawing a player from lowering his head to initially make any sort of hit with his helmet likely will be included in replay reviews for officials.

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

It’s the first day of organized football practice at Sunlake High School in Pasco County and about 60 students are running drills out in the field, wearing jerseys, shorts and helmets.

As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be.

An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players.

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A doctor who will be portrayed by actor Will Smith in the upcoming movie, "Concussion," told a Tampa audience how his research into brain injuries has dramatically changed how professional football approaches players.

What if a concussion could be diagnosed on the field like a diabetic testing their blood sugar? Orlando Health researchers are working on that.

There used to be a time when athletes would get knocked in the head, fall to the ground, struggle to get back on their feet and wobble around before regaining their bearings.

It used to be called "getting a ding." Athletes were encouraged to just "walk it off."

That still happens in many sports, from the youth levels all the way to the pros. But over the past few years, recreational leagues, schools and athletic associations have gotten more serious about these head injuries.

New Tool Used to Diagnose Concussions

Jan 8, 2015
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine med.miami.edu

According to a report from the NCAA, a little more than seven percent of injuries in college football are concussions. 

The term concussion started to gain steam in the American vernacular a few years ago. Former high-profile players had committed suicide and some wanted to link the player's deaths to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. The death of former Pittsburgh Steelers player Mike Webster is seen as the incident that launched the CTE debate.

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

While most of the buzz around concussions has been concentrated on football, girls who play sports are reporting concussions at twice of the rate of boys, experts say. Coaches of high school girls’ teams are taking concussions more seriously, the Orlando Sentinel reports.