climate change

A recent poll from Florida Atlantic University finds that the coronavirus pandemic has not significantly changed the way Floridians feel about climate change.

In 2013, an 18-month-old boy got sick after playing near a hollow tree in his backyard in a remote West African village. He developed a fever and started vomiting. His stool turned black. Two days later, he died.

A group of young people from Florida had their lawsuit against the state over climate change dismissed by a circuit judge in Leon County on Monday, and the kids plan to appeal.

Florida Judge Tosses Environmental Lawsuit Brought By Children

Jun 4, 2020
Oscar Psychas, 22, left, and Isaac Augspurg, 15, stand near Paynes Prairie in Gainesville on May 30, 2020. The two are part of the group of eight youth plaintiffs who say climate change has already affected their homes and lives.
Lauren Witte / WUFT

A Florida judge’s decision to dismiss a landmark environmental lawsuit from eight young plaintiffs tracks closely with decisions by courts in other states where such legal strategies have gained little traction. Is it a losing strategy?

Heat Policies In Florida May Overlook Most Vulnerable

May 5, 2020

Florida Gators football fans need only take a few steps to find relief from soaring stadium temperatures. Chilly misting stations, free all-you-can-drink ice water and specially designed air-conditioned “cooling buses” are available during the hottest home games at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. Athletic officials note that heat-related problems are a real danger and a common predicament on game days.

It came a week after the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, but a virtual roundtable on climate change and its effects on Florida took place Monday.

The League of Conservation Voters event was held in conjunction with the Joe Biden for President Campaign and spoke about how the former vice president would address the issue if elected. The LCV endorsed the presumptive Democratic nominee last week.

With workers and businesses around the planet suddenly shut down, scientists are getting an unexpected glimpse at a world with less carbon.

Aidan Chau is a junior at Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, where he majors in clarinet performance. Like many teens across the globe, he’s worried about what climate change could mean for the future.

Several Florida students are continuing a legal fight over climate change inaction. They're suing the governor and other state lawmakers for not doing enough about climate change. They claim their future is in jeopardy.

New sea level rise projections for South Florida show an alarming trend: higher waters are coming faster than previously expected.

According to the Southeast Florida Climate Compact, seas could rise between one foot and two-and-a-half feet by 2060 – two to five inches more than 2015 projections.

For years, Caribbean governments have argued their countries bear the brunt of climate change. A new U.N. study says Caribbean children may bear the worst of it.

When it comes to global health, the world has made remarkable strides over the past two decades. There has been unprecedented progress vaccinating kids, treating diseases and lifting millions out of poverty. The childhood death rate has been slashed in half since 2000. Adults are living an average 5 1/2 years longer.

From the Unconditional Surrender monument in Sarasota to the parliament in Sweden, the world’s youth are holding weekly protests and highlighting the realities of climate change, a topic of growing importance to young men and women.

Study Triples Population At Risk Of Climate-Triggered Floods

Oct 30, 2019
Daylina Miller/WUSF News

The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. 

Sierra Club Florida Chapter Director Frank Jackalone warned Friday that time is running short as the state faces the consequences of climate change.

Floridians with exotic animals, both legal and illegal, are being offered pet "amnesty," to turn in animals for which they can no longer care.

Nearly two-thirds of all bird species in North America are at risk of extinction due to climate change according to a new report, released Thursday by the National Audubon Society


A report recently released by the United Nations's International Panel on Climate Change finds that oceans around the world are in trouble.

More than 100 scientists from 36 countries worked on the report that shows carbon emissions from human activities are putting a dire strain on ocean health.

 

The findings have big implications for South Florida, where much of life revolves around the water.

Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried on Thursday plans to roll out legislative priorities focused on climate change. 

New data recently released shows that people of color are more exposed to air pollutants from Tampa Bay's busy roadways.

WUSF's Jessica Meszaros spoke with Amy Stuart, a professor in the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida, who is one of the researchers behind this study.

Hurricane Dorian left at least 20 people dead in the Bahamas before making its way up the east coast of Florida and the U.S.

Scientists have said the catastrophic storm was made worse by rising global temperatures.

Hurricanes such as Dorian are providing valuable data and modeling for planners and politicians working to battle climate change.

The process is called resiliency

Hurricane Dorian is predicted to finally leave the Bahamas Tuesday after spending two days wrecking - and in many places drowning -  the islands of Abaco and Grand Bahama.

WLRN’s Sundial host Luis Hernandez spoke with Americas editor Tim Padgett about the Bahamas devastation – and the urgent need to help make South Florida’s island neighbors more resilient to monster storms.

Florida agriculture leaders met in Gainesville this week to talk about climate change solutions within the industry.

The meeting came after a warning from the United Nations urging farmers and foresters to adapt to global warming -- for the sake of the environment and the agriculture industry.

WUSF's Jessica Meszaros spoke with Lynetta Usher Griner, a logger and one of the organizers of the Gainesville meeting. 

Randall Dasher is a fourth-generation Florida farmer and until last year, he never had a crop of iron-clay cowpeas fail.

"Something has changed and somewhere, someway, that has affected our yields," he said Monday during a panel at the University of Florida, where farmers met with U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor of Tampa, scientists and agriculture officials.

By Steve Newborn

In 1995, a heat wave killed more than 700 people in Chicago. It affected mostly elderly, African-American women who lived on their own.

A report released this week shows climate change could mean a lot more days of extreme heat for Florida and Tampa Bay, and with it, the likelihood residents will be exposed to significant health risks.

By Jessica Meszaros

A new study describes the future mass redistribution of plants and animals on Earth due to climate change. 

 
The research conducted by the University of Florida and the University of Tasmania appears in the journal Nature Climate Change.
 
An author of the study says Florida is already experiencing this migration due to global warming.
 
Brett Scheffers, a professor of wildlife ecology at UF, spoke with WUSF's Jessica Meszaros.

By Carrie Pinkard

A dark mass stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico. It’s slowly growing, and choking the life out of some marine animals.

The mass is a giant seaweed bloom called the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt.

Carlos Curbelo is considering a run for Miami-Dade Mayor in 2020. 

Miami native, son of Cuban exiles and former Republican Representative from Florida’s 26th District (2015-2018), Curbelo is no stranger to politics. In the November 2018 elections he went against Democrat Debbie Murcasel-Powell and executed one of the most expensive U.S. House races in the country. Mucarsel-Powell defeated Curbelo in a close and contested race.

Replacing and refurbishing old coastal pumps to brace for sea level rise could cost South Florida tens of millions of dollars per year over the next decade.

In a report to South Florida Water Management District governing board members on Thursday, district hydrology chief Aki Owosina said a review of the 16-county agency found that 26 of the 36 coastal pumps would likely fail to do their job or be in danger of not working. The most vulnerable were in Miami-Dade, Broward and Collier counties.

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