citrus greening

Researchers at the University of Florida released a study this month in the journal Phytopathology, saying there's a way to more quickly and efficiently kill bacteria that causes citrus greening disease.

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A year after Hurricane Irma ravaged Florida’s citrus industry, growers are on pace to slightly surpass their production from two years ago.

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Florida's citrus industry got some dire news Tuesday from an organization that advises the federal government on science and technical matters.

As the University of Florida’s Citrus Research and Education Center prepares to celebrate its centennial anniversary, researchers there say that they’re on the cusp of developing a cure to the most serious threat facing the citrus industry worldwide:  citrus greening. 

The Florida Supreme Court will not overturn the governor’s vetoes of money the state owes some residents for destroying their citrus trees. However, justices did appear to agree the homeowners are due their compensation.


  The Florida Legislature finally included compensation in the state budget for Lee County and Broward County residents after agriculture officials removed their healthy citrus trees in the early 2000s. It was a failed attempt by the Florida Department of Agriculture to eradicate the bacterial disease citrus canker. These residents hope the governor will sign the state budget to end their years-long battle. 

Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio met with Southwest Florida citrus growers Friday in Immokalee to discuss challenges facing the industry and how the federal government can help.  The bacterial disease, citrus greening, has decimated the industry over the past decade, reducing crop yields by 70 percent compared to where they stood twenty years ago. 

Researchers: Closer To Finding Citrus Greening Cure

Oct 19, 2016

Research scientists at the University of Florida’s Citrus Research and Education Center say they are on the cusp of finding a cure for greening disease.

Laurel wilt has destroyed thousands of avocado trees in most counties across the state. While the deadly disease has not yet made it to several Panhandle counties, experts say it’s only a matter of time.

Nelson To Talk Greening With Citrus Growers

Oct 13, 2015
Amy Green/WMFE

  Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) is meeting with citrus growers in Lakeland today and will likely hear how citrus greening and the Oriental fruit fly are taking a big bite out of their crop. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is forecasting a Florida orange crop of 80 million boxes for the 2015- 16 season. That’s 17 percent lower than last season.

Growers were expecting a lower yield because of HLB, or citrus greening disease, said Florida Citrus Mutual’s Communications Director Andrew Meadows.

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For the first time in years, Florida citrus growers are juiced at the prospect of getting a new defense against citrus greening, the bacterial disease slowly killing their trees, perhaps as early as spring.

Florida's citrus industry is hurting in a big way.  The final report of the growing season by the U.S. Department of Agriculture put Florida orange production for the 2014-15 season at 96.7 million boxes, a drop of 4 percent from last year.