CHIP

By Daylina Miller

Of the 8.6 million children in working families who are covered by public insurance, more than 70% have a parent who works at a large, private company, according to a new study from PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

The number of children covered by Medicaid declined in Florida and other states for the first time in more than a decade.

The number and rate of uninsured children increased in Florida and across the nation in 2017, according to a report released today by Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families.

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The number of Medicaid patients in Florida could be decreasing like never before. Members of the state’s Social Services Estimating Conference on Wednesday agreed to revise downward overall Medicaid enrollment estimates for fiscal year 2018-2019 from 4.02 million people to 3.86 million people. 

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U.S. Navy

While Florida has made strides in reducing the number of uninsured children, a national health-care expert warned Thursday that those gains are likely stalling, and she put part of the blame on increased scrutiny of immigration status.

Georgetown University Center For Children and Families

A federal law providing 10 more years of funding for the national Children’s Health Insurance Program should help Florida continue to reduce its rate of uninsured kids.

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The Trump administration is unveiling a multibillion-dollar roster of proposed spending cuts but is leaving this year's $1.3 trillion catchall spending bill alone.

When parts of the federal government ground to halt this past weekend, Linda Nablo, who oversees the Children's Health Insurance Program in Virginia, had two letters drafted and ready to go out to the families of 68,000 children insured through the program, depending on what happened.

One said the federal government had failed to extend CHIP after funding expired in September and the stopgap funding had run out. The program would be shutting down and families would lose their insurance.

What Happens When CHIP Funds Run Out

Jan 20, 2018

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Agency For Health Care Administration

The state is disputing a report that found funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program in Florida will run out in February if Congress doesn't act.

Some states are facing a mid-January loss of funding for their Children's Health Insurance Program despite spending approved by Congress in late December that was expected to keep the program running for three months, federal health officials said Friday.

The $2.85 billion was supposed to fund states' CHIP programs through March 31. But some states will start running out of money after Jan. 19, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. CMS did not say which states are likely to be affected first.

Congress has passed a funding measure that keeps the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) going through March — the program insures hundreds of thousands of kids in Florida.

But without a permanent solution in place by the end of January, many families could see their coverage lapse and Governor Rick Scott won’t say whether they should be worried.


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U.S. Navy

Congress again failed to approve long-term funds for a popular program that provides health insurance for nearly 9 million low-income children, leaving each party blaming the other for Christmas-season gridlock and states scrambling to decide how to parcel out dwindling money.

Georgetown University

Recent efforts in Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare are overshadowing an important deadline to fund children's health insurance.

Federal funding that provides insurance for nearly 340,000 Florida kids will expire in September unless Congress acts. It’s called the  Children’s Health Insurance Program and it supports kids who don’t qualify for Medicaid.

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a "repeal and replace" bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump's desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Health Policy Institute/Georgetown University

According to a new report, more children than ever before have health insurance.

Florida joins 40 other states that insured more children between 2013 and 2015.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

  Gov. Rick Scott hasn’t responded to a bipartisan congressional inquiry regarding the future of the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, according to the Miami Herald.

Florida, Texas Expand Medicaid – For Kids

Sep 29, 2014

Republican lawmakers in Florida and Texas snubbed the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion for adults, but their states did broaden the program this year -- for school-age children.

CHIP Future Unclear Under Health Law

Sep 18, 2014

The Children’s Health Insurance Program, a joint federal-state program known as CHIP, has helped cut in half the number of uninsured children since being enacted less than two decades ago, but its future is in doubt due to limited funding in the federal health law of 2010.  A year from now, CHIP will run out of money.  Some advocates for the program want the federal government to finance CHIP for another four years, while other experts have suggested two would suffice.  The Senate Finance Committee’s Subcommittee on Health Care will hold a hearing on the issue Tuesday.

Getting rid of the five-year waiting period for children of legal immigrants to get health coverage through KidCare will improve health outcomes and save money, writes Cindy Arenberg Seltzer, president/CEO of the Children's Services Council of Broward County, in a column in the South Florida Sun Sentinel. Seltzer is urging lawmakers to pass measures that would eliminate the waiting period and give KidCare to more than 25,000 children.  

About 11 percent of children in Florida are uninsured, one of the highest rates in the nation, according to a new report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. The report noted a 1.8 percent decline in the rate from 2010 to 2012 in Florida.