CDC

Aaron Burden

A new report issued by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that COVID-19 spread through a Georgia overnight summer camp where attendees “vigorously” sang and cheered in June.

The camp adhered to “most recommended strategies to prevent transmission,” including requiring campers to show proof of negative COVID-19 tests conducted at least 12 days prior to their arrival. But the camp did not make campers wear cloth masks.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

A coronavirus vaccine could be ready for distribution by the end of the year, and distributed to Americans in 2021, the nation's top infectious disease specialist told lawmakers Friday.

While it typically takes years to develop vaccines, new technologies, the lack of bureaucratic red tape and the human body's robust immune response to COVID-19 have hastened the process, Dr. Anthony Fauci said.

Earlier this month, when the Trump administration told hospitals to send crucial data about coronavirus cases and intensive care capacity to a new online system, it promised the change would be worth it. The data would be more complete and transparent and an improvement over the old platform run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, administration officials said.

Instead, the public data hub created under the new system is updated erratically and is rife with inconsistencies and errors, data analysts say.

As schools look into potential reopening plans this fall, whether to require masks has become a central part of the discussion.

Comments on masks being harmful are popping up in local government meetings regarding mask ordinances—like a recent emergency meeting in Taylor County. Resident Angela Archer says she has some concerns:

"Masks have not been proven to prevent COVID. They do reduce [oxygen] levels of the people wearing the mask. They also cause the person wearing the mask to breathe in the poisonous gas of carbon monoxide."

Coronavirus infections in the United States are far higher than what has been confirmed, although the number of Americans who have been exposed is far below what is required for widespread immunity, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The data appeared on both the CDC website and in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Tuesday.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will not release a set of documents this week aimed at giving schools advice on how to reopen to students after coronavirus shutdowns, NPR has learned. Instead, the full set will be published before the end of the month, a CDC spokesperson says.

"These science and evidence-based resources and tools will provide additional information for administrators, teachers and staff, parents, caregivers and guardians, as together we work towards the public health-oriented goal of safely opening schools this fall," the spokesperson said.

Updated July 16, 9:40 a.m. ET

The Trump Administration has mandated that hospitals sidestep the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and send critical information about COVID-19 hospitalizations and equipment to a different federal database.

From the start of the pandemic, the CDC has collected data on COVID-19 hospitalizations, availability of intensive care beds and personal protective equipment. But hospitals must now report that information to the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC.

Updated 6:15 p.m. ET

More than 1,200 current employees at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have signed a letter calling for the federal agency to address "ongoing and recurring acts of racism and discrimination" against Black employees, NPR has learned.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's top infectious disease expert, told members of Congress on Tuesday that although he can't predict the ultimate number of infections and deaths related to the coronavirus, "it's going to be very disturbing."

Millions of Americans have probably had the coronavirus without knowing it.

That's the conclusion of officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and many other experts.

"Our best estimate right now is that for every case that was reported, there actually were 10 other infections," Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the CDC, said during a call with reporters Thursday.

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently took an unusual step of encouraging people to drive alone — the exact opposite of what cities have urged people to do for years.

According to information released Wednesday by the Florida Department of Health, 47,471 people have tested positive for the coronavirus; an increase of 527 since Tuesday.

A nationwide analysis of COVID-19 data released this week shows broad discrepancies between what some states are reporting about testing for the novel coronavirus to the public, and what is being reported by the CDC. The analysis lists Florida as “the most extreme case” of testing discrepancies between what the state and the federal government are reporting.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added several new symptoms to its existing list of symptoms for COVID-19.

The CDC has long said that fever, cough and shortness of breath are indications that someone might have the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. It has now added six more conditions that may come with the disease: chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell.

About 1 in 3 people who become sick enough to require hospitalization from COVID-19 were African American, according to hospital data from the first month of the U.S. epidemic released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Even though 33% of those hospitalized patients were black, African Americans constitute 13% of the U.S. population. By contrast, the report found that 45% of hospitalizations were among white people, who make up 76% percent of the population. And 8% of hospitalizations were among Hispanics, who make up 18% of the population.

The federal government Saturday unveiled the first detailed national system for tracking the coronavirus pandemic in the United States.

The new COVIDView system will provide weekly updates aimed at monitoring the outbreak across the country, based on the results of tests for the virus, people seeking care for flu-like systems and pneumonia and those diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.

Updated at 1:55 a.m. ET Monday

In an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now advising against gatherings of 50 people or more for the next eight weeks.

With nine Florida-related coronavirus cases at last report, concern is growing about the spread of the disease but testing isn’t widely available at this point.

Flu A Bigger Worry In Florida Than Coronavirus, USF Doctor Tells Lawmakers

Feb 19, 2020
WHO says people without symptoms probably account for about 6 percent of spread of the coronavirus, at most.
iStock

The flu remains a far deadlier illness to worry about in Florida than the coronavirus, state lawmakers were told on Tuesday.

While the coronavirus that started in China has spawned massive media attention --- and reams of misinformation --- Tampa General Hospital physician and University of South Florida faculty member John Sinnott said the state has more pressing health risks right now.

“Influenza is the elephant in the room no one is talking about,” Sinnott told members of the Senate Health Policy Committee. “It’s killing people.”

Florida College in Temple Terrace is isolating students who do not have proof of vaccination against the measles after a student was diagnosed with the virus on campus.

Coronavirus Has Not Been Found In Florida

Jan 28, 2020
Wikimedia Commons

The coronavirus has not been found in any people who have traveled to Florida recently from the area of China where an outbreak of the respiratory illness began, Gov. Ron DeSantis said Monday. 

After decades of progress against one of the most contagious human viruses, the world is seeing measles stage a slow, steady comeback.

The World Health Organization and the CDC say in a new report that there were nearly 10 million cases of measles last year, with outbreaks on every continent.

An estimated 140,000 people died from measles in 2018, WHO says, up from an all-time low of 90,000 in 2016.

And so far 2019 has been even worse.

Fried Urges Consumers To Look For Florida Lettuce

Nov 26, 2019

State Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried urged people to look for the “Fresh From Florida” logo on romaine lettuce after federal health officials issued a warning about an E.coli outbreak that is likely from the Salinas growing region of California. 

Florida Vaping Illnesses Climb To 87

Nov 8, 2019

Florida had received reports of 87 vaping-related illnesses as of Saturday, an increase of nine cases during the prior week, according to numbers posted by the Florida Department of Health and a News Service of Florida analysis of the data.

The number of deaths in the state stemming from the pulmonary illnesses remained at one.

Childhood trauma causes serious health repercussions throughout life and is a public health issue that calls for concerted prevention efforts. That's the takeaway of a report published Tuesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Updated Nov. 5, 1:55 p.m. ET

In the wake of vaping-related deaths and illnesses, the Drug Enforcement Administration is expanding "National Prescription Drug Take Back Day," and this year allowing people to drop off electronic vaping devices and cartridges.

Florida Health Providers Receive Guidance On Vaping Injuries

Oct 14, 2019

With 1,299 reported cases of lung injuries associated with vaping and electronic cigarettes across the nation, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday announced interim guidelines for health-care providers treating people who have the conditions. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention intensified its warnings about the risks of vaping, as the number of patients with vaping-related illness continues to climb.

The case count has reached 1,080, the agency announced Thursday. There have been 18 deaths in 15 states, and more deaths are being investigated. All patients reported a history of vaping, and the majority reported using THC-containing products.

The mystery of the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses is still not solved.

But investigators in Illinois and Wisconsin have found some clues, they announced Friday in a press briefing.

Investigators in these two states conducted detailed interviews with 86 patients — mostly young men — and 66% said they had vaped THC products labeled as Dank Vapes. THC is the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.

What are Dank Vapes and how could they be fueling the outbreak?

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