cancer

Researchers are beginning to understand why certain brain cancers are so hard to stop.

Three studies published Wednesday in the journal Nature found that these deadly tumors integrate themselves into the brain's electrical network and then hijack signals from healthy nerve cells to fuel their own growth.

Florida Lawmaker Seeks Cancer Awareness Instruction In Schools

Sep 17, 2019
Empty classroom with chalkboard on wall
Pixabay

A Senate Democrat is seeking to require that Florida high-school students learn about preventing breast cancer and prostate cancer. 

Judge: Boy Must Resume Chemotherapy, Despite Parents' Wishes

May 10, 2019
Hand near bag's of intorvenus chemotherapy fluid
Pixabay

A judge has ruled that a 3-year-old Tampa boy must resume his cancer treatment, despite his parents' wishes. 

For years now some members of the legislature have been pushing to create a way to help firefighters battling cancer. Studies show they are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease, because of their line of work. This year the effort has overwhelming support in the Senate but hasn’t been heard in a house committee yet.

A woman in California who says Johnson & Johnson baby powder caused her to develop mesothelioma was awarded $29 million by a jury Wednesday. J&J says it will appeal the judgment.

Carol Marley wants everyone to know what a life-threatening cancer diagnosis looks like in America today.

Yes, it's the chemotherapy that leaves you weak and unable to walk across the room. Yes, it's the litany of tests and treatments – the CT scans and MRIs and biopsies and endoscopies and surgeries and blood draws and radiation and doctor visits. Yes, it's envisioning your funeral, which torments you day and night.

But none of these is her most gnawing, ever present concern.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Gavel and a stethoscope
Flickr Creative Commons

A divided appeals court Wednesday said an out-of-state firm that mines and sells talc should be dismissed from a Broward County lawsuit alleging that a woman developed ovarian cancer because of the use of talcum powder.

The 4th District Court of Appeal, in a 2-1 decision, said Florida courts do not have “jurisdiction” over Imerys Talc America, Inc. because of its lack of contact with Florida.

The ruling came in a case filed by Judith Ricketts against Imerys Talc America, Johnson & Johnson and Publix Super Markets.

Flickr

The University of Central Florida is taking over the Orlando facility of a medical research organization that had received more than $350 million in public and private incentives.

WMFE

A jury's $289 million award to a former school groundskeeper who said Monsanto's Roundup left him dying of cancer will bolster thousands of pending cases and open the door for countless people who blame their suffering on the weed killer, the man's lawyers said.

American Cancer Society

Florida is not doing enough to prevent cancer, according to a new report by the American Cancer Society’s political-action committee.

Google

Low levels of cancer-causing chemicals have been found in three wells of a Florida town.

As we head into the Summer months, health officials say protecting yourself from the sun’s intense rays with protective sunscreen, clothing, and eyewear is key. The goal is ensure Floridians do not get skin cancer and if they do, detect it early.

A court ruling that gave coffee drinkers a jolt earlier this year was finalized Monday when a Los Angeles judge said coffee sold in California must carry cancer warnings.

Abe Aboraya/WMFE

At the border between Brevard and Orange counties, a line of fire trucks with their lights on greet Tom “Bull” Hill as a hero when he arrives to walk across the county.

There's encouraging news for cancer treatments that stimulate the immune system to attack cancer cells. A widely used immunotherapy drug appears to be useful in a greater number of patients with lung cancer.

The drug called Keytruda, or pembrolizumab, is already prescribed to a group of patients who have a type of malignancy called non-small cell lung cancer. It's the principal form of lung cancer and found most commonly in people who have smoked.

Fundraisers in support of the fight against cancer are springing up all over Tallahassee. One such event on Friday (4/6) evening involved the Leon County Sheriff's Office.

An experimental vaccine could be on the market for ovarian-cancer patients as soon as 2022, according to the Jacksonville-based company that makes it.

The River City’s Mayo Clinic is participating in the trials.

One spring morning in 2015, Barbara Lipska got up as usual, dyed her hair and went for a jog in her suburban Virginia neighborhood.

But when she returned from a much longer than expected run, her husband Mirek was completely taken aback.

"I was lost in my own neighborhood," Lipska says. "The hair dye that I put in my hair that morning dripped down my neck. I looked like a monster when I came back home."

Michael Robertson was on his summer vacation a few years ago and had just proposed to the woman who would become his wife when he decided he needed to see a doctor.

"I'd been having symptoms for a few months but it was during an intense work period, drinking too much coffee, not getting enough sleep, so I kind of chalked it up to that," Robertson says. Unfortunately, the doctor had a more dire diagnosis: stage 4 rectal cancer.

The Associated Press

A Florida teen who was initially diagnosed with the flu is now being treated for cancer.

Dustin Snyder / Facebook page

A Hillsborough County teen who had been battling a rare form of cancer has died less than a month after marrying his high school sweetheart.

Shaorong Deng is sitting up in bed at the Hangzhou Cancer Hospital waiting for his doctor. Thin and frail, the 53-year-old construction worker's coat drapes around his shoulders to protect against the chilly air.

Deng has advanced cancer of the esophagus, a common form of cancer in China. He went through radiation and chemotherapy, but the cancer kept spreading.

Doctors Learn How To Talk To Patients About Dying

Feb 12, 2018
National Institutes of Health

Lynn Black’s mother-in-law, who had lupus and lung cancer, was rushed into a hospital intensive care unit last summer with shortness of breath. As she lay in bed, intubated and unresponsive, a parade of doctors told the family “all good news.”

There has been concerns for years over a disproportionate number of cancer cases among former and current students, faculty and staff at a Bradenton high school. That has led the Manatee County School Board and Board of Commissioners to request a study from the Florida Department of Health.

Bayshore High School has been in operation since 1962, but the district’s electronic records of students only go back to 1985 and to 1993 for the staff.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Please sign up here to get occasional updates from WBUR's ongoing series, "This Moment in Cancer."

Even three queasy pregnancies didn't prepare Kate Murphy for the nonstop nausea that often comes with chemotherapy.

Researchers say they have taken a step toward developing a blood test that would detect eight common cancers, possibly even before symptoms appear.

As they report Thursday in the journal Science, they're hoping their idea would eventually lead to a $500 test that can screen for cancer and identify people with the disease when it's in its earliest stages and more treatable.

But they have a long way to go.

People diagnosed with cancer understandably reach for the very best that medical science has to offer. That motivation is increasingly driving people to ask to have the DNA of their tumors sequenced. And while that's useful for some malignancies, the hype of precision medicine for cancer is getting far ahead of the facts.

It's easy to understand why that's the case. When you hear stories about the use of DNA sequencing to create individualized cancer treatment, chances are they are uplifting stories. Like that of Ben Stern.

You might not suspect that the success of the emerging field of precision medicine depends heavily on the couriers who push carts down hospital halls.

But samples taken during surgery may end up in poor shape by the time they get to the pathology lab — and that has serious implications for patients as well as for scientists who want to use that material to develop personalized tests and treatments that are safer and more effective.

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