breastfeeding

War Is The Enemy Of Breastfeeding

Aug 6, 2019

The babies arrive small and skinny. To a health worker's eye, it's clear they're not growing well, though it's often only a health crisis like a fever or severe diarrhea that leads their mothers to make what is almost always a long trek to the Al Salam Hospital in Khamir, Yemen.

"By then, the babies are too weak to breastfeed," says Fiona Bay, a nurse with Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) at the hospital.

Health officials have long touted the benefits of breastfeeding.

According to The American Academy of Pediatrics, human milk protects against a variety of diseases.

The "Big Latch-On" is an annual global effort to promote the benefits of breastfeeding to improve infant health. The goal is to educate mothers on best practices and to offer peer support.

Inflexible work schedules and lack of support can make it tough for new mothers in the military to keep breastfeeding their children.

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare has received a baby friendly accreditation as part of a worldwide initiative. It’s one of 19 hospitals in Florida with that designation.

You wouldn't know it by looking at her but, according to her mother, Sandra Lobaina was a biter. 

“I bit her," said Lobaina, smiling, when asked to explain why her mother didn't breastfeed her. "After that, she stopped. Even though I was a few days old, and I didn’t have teeth. But she was in pain, wasn’t in the correct position. And there wasn’t anyone there to come in and help her.”

Now Lobaina works as a licensed midwife and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant to make sure other mothers have the support they need to breastfeed. 

As of July, mothers in all 50 states can freely breastfeed in public. This comes right in time for August, National Breastfeeding Month.

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The U.S. opposed a World Health Assembly resolution to encourage breastfeeding because it called for limits on the promotion of infant formula, not because of objections to breastfeeding, President Donald Trump tweeted Monday.

Tallahassee’s airport is now one of seven in Florida to offer a new feature for breastfeeding moms. 

Arnetta Gordon is a Miami-Dade public school teacher.  After leaving Miami to escape Hurricane Irma with her husband and four children, she returned to her Liberty City home which like thousands of others had no electricity.  Gordon has a 9-month old infant who she breastfeeds.

She wrote WLRN about the challenges of breastfeeding with no power:

Tuesday marks the start of World Breastfeeding Week, and a number of Panhandle county health departments are marking the week with several events.

Babies who required extra nutrition just after birth used to rely on a formula made from cow’s milk. But now, hospitals are turning away from dairy in favor of food produced by their own species.

University of Florida Health Jacksonville is among the first hospitals in Northeast Florida to offer donor milk or a human-milk-based concentrate, known as a fortifier, in both its newborn nursery and neonatal intensive care unit.


George Skene / Orlando Sentinel

It could trade for 400 times more than t7/8he price of crude oil and 2,000 times more than iron ore. If sold off the shelf, it could cost more than 150 times the price of a gallon of cow’s milk and 15 times more than coffee.

Going for as much as $4 per ounce, human breast milk is a hot commodity that is emerging as a surprisingly cutthroat industry, one that states are now seeking to regulate amid a battle for control between nonprofit and for-profit banks that supply hospital neonatal units.