Abortion

The new anti-abortion tilt of the U.S. Supreme Court has inspired some states to further restrict the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy and move to outlaw abortion entirely if Roe v. Wade ever falls. But the rush to regulate has exposed division among groups and lawmakers who consider themselves staunch abortion opponents.

Baby toys set on a floor
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Kristen Erichsen was in high school and homeless when she found out she was in her first trimester.“My Mom and I had been evicted three times already that year. She didn’t have a job. I was too young to get a job.” 

WGCU

Legislation that would require consent from a parent or guardian before a girl under 18 could obtain an abortion was approved by a Florida Senate committee. 

Florida Abortion Bill Would Require Minors To Obtain Consent

Apr 8, 2019
Erin Grall, R-Vero Beach
News Service of Florida

Stephanie Loraine Piñeiro was 17 when she discovered she was pregnant for the second time. 

She says her parents were livid about her first pregnancy a year earlier, though she never dared tell them she was raped. Her father took her to a clinic for an abortion. On the way home, she says, he threw birth control pills from the clinic out of the car window and ordered her to abstain. 

A measure (HB 1335) that would require minors to receive parental consent before getting an abortion cleared its second state House committee Wednesday. 

Parental Consent Abortion Bill Backed

Mar 20, 2019
Erin Grall, R-Vero Beach
News Service of Florida

Florida could block teenagers from getting abortions unless their parents agree, under a bill that began moving forward Tuesday in the Republican-dominated House. 

Under a pair of bills going before the Florida legislature this session, women could be charged with a third degree felony if they get an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected.

The News Service of Florida

A controversial abortion measure known as the “fetal heartbeat bill” has been filed in the Florida Senate, mirroring a bill filed last month in the House. 

With six weeks until the start of the Legislative session, a Republican state representative from Pensacola introduced a bill last week that would ban abortions if a doctor detects a fetal heartbeat. That usually happens about six weeks into a pregnancy, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant.

Reproductive rights activists have denounced the law, calling it the latest in a series of assaults on a woman’s right to choose. Others point out its unconstitutionality.

Update 2/26/19: Two Republican state lawmakers wants to ban abortions in Florida once a heartbeat is detected.

Rep. Mike Hill (R-Pensacola), first filed the bill making it a third-degree felony for any physician who violates the proposed law. 

On Feb. 7, Republican Sen. Dennis Baxley (R-Lady Lake)  filed a companion measure in the Senate.

“It’s time for us to face our history of the last 46 years and the 60 million faces of our offspring that we have extinguished. The heartbeat has always been the clear signal of the presence of life, and that life must be protected," Baxley said in a written statement sent from his office.

He noted a similar proposal was passed in Ohio last year but was vetoed by that state's governor. 

“I think we have a great opportunity this year," Baxley said. “Our new Governor, Ron DeSantis has expressed support for meaningful pro-life legislation, so I don’t think we’ll run in to the same issues that Ohio did.”

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A state appeals court will hear arguments in March about the constitutionality of a 2015 law that would require women to wait 24 hours before having abortions.

Nick Evans/WFSU

A House Republican filed a proposal Thursday that would block physicians from performing abortions if fetal heartbeats have been detected.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With Democrats now in control of the U.S. House of Representatives, it might appear that the fight over abortion rights has become a standoff.

After all, abortion-rights supporters within the Democratic caucus will be in a position to block the kind of curbs that Republicans advanced over the past two years when they had control of Congress.

But those on both sides of the debate insist that won't be the case.

George Hodan (Public Domain Pictures)

The 1st District Court of Appeal has agreed to hear arguments in a battle about the constitutionality of a 2015 state law that would require women to wait 24 hours before having abortions, according to an online docket.

With a newly configured U.S. Supreme Court, the stakes are high for abortion-rights battles at the state level. Abortion-rights advocates and opponents are preparing for a busy year — from a tug-of-war over Roe v. Wade to smaller efforts that could expand or restrict access to abortion.

Updated at 9:35 a.m. ET

A federal judge in Mississippi has permanently blocked one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country — a ban on the procedure after 15 weeks of gestation.

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The fate of a Kentucky abortion law is in the hands of a federal judge after a trial wrapped up Monday over a lawsuit pitting Gov. Matt Bevin's administration and the state's only abortion clinic.

Architect of the Capitol

Planned Parenthood on Wednesday launched a campaign to protect access to abortion as widely as possible even if the Supreme Court, with the addition of conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh, moves to curtail a woman's right to undergo the procedure.

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday said he views Roe v. Wade as settled law, according to Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, but the answer did little to mollify Democrats who say he would restrict abortion access from the bench.

Planned Parenthood Federation of America told NPR on Thursday it will be joining officials in a growing number of states to oppose a Trump administration proposal to withhold federal funds from family planning clinics that provide information about or refer women seeking an abortion.

Architect of the Capitol

Abortion-rights advocates are intensifying efforts to make it easier for women to get abortions amid a new wave of state-level bans and restrictions expected to occur under a reconfigured U.S. Supreme Court.

Progressive and civil rights organizations are speaking out against the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Reproductive rights advocacy group Planned Parenthood is the latest to do so.

With the balance of the Supreme Court in question, some abortion-rights advocates are quietly preparing for a future they hope never to see — one without the protections of Roe v. Wade.

Guttmacher Institute

What would the U.S. look like without Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion nationwide?

That’s the question now that President Donald Trump has chosen conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Gavel and a stethoscope
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In a case that focused heavily on First Amendment rights, a federal judge has issued a permanent injunction against a 2016 abortion law approved by Florida lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott.

Architect of the Capitol

The Supreme Court on Tuesday effectively put an end to a California law that forces anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to provide information about abortion.

Public opinion on abortion rights is often framed as a binary choice between two political positions, but a closer look at new polling data from Gallup reveals more nuance.

While a majority of Americans support legalized abortion in early pregnancy, most oppose it in the later stages, according to the survey.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

The Trump administration will resurrect a Reagan-era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions, or sharing space with abortion providers.

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