Daylina Miller

Health News Florida Reporter

Daylina Miller is a multimedia reporter for WUSF and Health News Florida, covering health in the Tampa Bay area and across the state.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist at The Tampa Tribune in 2005, and has since worked as a reporter for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle, the Tampa campus newspaper.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University and through the program started Dames & Dice, a tabletop gaming blog.

The Trump administration recently passed a law making it illegal to sell tobacco products, including e-cigarettes to anyone under 21. 

The day after Florida’s Senate voted on a controversial parental consent bill, a national pro-life group announced a multi-million dollar campaign that targets Florida voters in particular.

In 2008, a bill was signed into law that allowed out-of-state dentists to practice in Florida, but a sunset provision allowed this license to be repealed Jan. 1, 2020.

Only one Tampa Bay area hospital received a five-star rating on the latest hospital scorecard issued by the federal government. 

A bill that would exempt applied behavior analysis clinics from needing an expensive state license is headed to the Florida House floor for a vote in the next month.

Supporters of the proposed bill say clinics that treat children on the autism spectrum will face tough financial decisions if it doesn't pass.

Florida College in Temple Terrace is isolating students who do not have proof of vaccination against the measles after a student was diagnosed with the virus on campus.

CVS Health debuted its HealthHUB concept in Florida this week with nine Tampa Bay locations that include the urgent care MinuteClinics.

If there's one good word to describe the new USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute, it may just be “open.”


The first week of flu season in Florida this year was a tough one. Health officials documented more cases than they saw during the 2017-2018 season, which was one of the worst on record.

When students at the University of South Florida return to school Monday, most members of the Morsani College of Medicine will no longer be attending classes on the Tampa campus.

Instead, they’ll be learning in a new state-of-the-art facility downtown.  


People at risk for Alzheimer's disease could one day get their diagnosis decades earlier - at the eye doctor.

More than 1.9 million Floridians signed up for health coverage through the federal marketplace during the enrollment period that ended Dec. 17.

A Florida lawmaker filed a bill that would allow counties to ban smoking on their public beaches and parks.

A new report shows Florida's health ranking has dropped from 29th to 33rd, making it the second-largest drop nationally, especially in terms of terms of health behaviors, the environment, public health policies and clinical care.

A state pilot program that uses GPS to track therapists who serve children on the autism spectrum is so fraught with problems that providers say they are having a hard time going to appointments and getting paid.

A proposed federal bill would lower the costs of prescription drugs for Medicare Part D enrollees by requiring the program to negotiate prices and cap out-of-pocket expenses.

Florida Blue is expanding its Sanitas Medical clinics with four new centers in Hillsborough County early next year.

The Florida Department of Health in Pinellas County is observing National Influenza Vaccination Week on Wednesday, Dec. 4 with free flu shots for residents.

A new Commonwealth Fund report finds that workers and their families are spending more of their incomes on health care.

A new Commonwealth Fund report finds that workers and their families are spending more of their incomes on health care.

A nonprofit program funded in part by local government entities helps low-income Floridians make modifications to their homes to improve health and safety.

Part of the program focuses on making homes safer for children with severe allergies and asthma, like 5-year-old Tampa resident Mario Garcia.

A poll from the advocacy group National Consumers League shows that 86 % of Floridians think cannabidiol products “should be safe, backed by proven science and work as advertised.”

A new report says as many as 2,776 older Floridians died prematurely between 2014 and 2017 because of the state’s failure to expand Medicaid, second only to Texas, which lost 2,920 lives.

Overdose deaths related to synthetic opiods like fentanyl increased 1002% nationally between 2011 and 2016, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In Manatee County, overdose deaths from January through October of this year doubled compared to the same time period in 2018 - many of which are attributed to fentanyl, according to the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office.

The March of Dimes has awarded Florida a C- ranking when it comes its rate of premature births, a ranking only slightly worse than the national average.

According to a new survey, Florida employers are almost twice as likely to offer high deductible health plans – than the national average.

The number and rate of uninsured children continued to increase in Florida and across the nation in 2018, according to a report released today by Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. 

Religious exemptions from vaccinations required for school children have been on the rise in Florida.

Public health officials say even a small increase in these exemptions can threaten the herd immunity that protects people who can't be vaccinated due to health reasons, especially when it comes to diseases like the measles.

Immigration advocates say 7,200 Florida children could be harmed if their parents lose Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – or DACA - benefits that allow them to stay in the country. 

The United States Supreme Court will consider oral arguments Nov. 12 in a case brought by the Trump Administration that would take away those benefits. 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will penalize 2,583 hospitals nationwide for having too many Medicare patients readmitted within 30 days, according to federal data analyzed by Kaiser Health News.

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