Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he's covered race, identity and culture since 2015.

He's based in Los Angeles but reports nationally, looking for small or nuanced human stories that tell us something larger.

In 2018 he was based in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reporting on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria while on special assignment for NPR's National Desk.

Before joining NPR, he was a reporter at NPR Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, covering public health. Before that, he was the U.S.-Mexico border reporter at KPBS in San Diego. He began his career as a staff writer at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on U.S.-Latin America relations. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's also an organizer of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates the two countries.

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Local lawmakers in San Francisco have given the mayor 12 days to secure 7,000 hotel rooms to house the city's homeless population during the coronavirus emergency, plus another 1,250 rooms for frontline workers.

The emergency ordinance passed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors requires Mayor London Breed to secure the rooms by April 26 and asks her to use emergency powers to commandeer the rooms if she is unable to reach deals with hotel owners.

César Díaz felt lucky that only a couple of leaks had sprung in his ceiling, even though Hurricane Maria tore the zinc panels off much of his roof. His real troubles began about a year after the storm, when a crew hired by Puerto Rico's housing department showed up to make the repairs.

"They weren't very professional," Díaz said. "They didn't wear gloves, and they asked if I had an extra piece of wood."

Within days, there were new leaks. Not only in the living room but in the bedroom, over his daughter's crib.

Mabel Román Padró wishes she hadn't had to sue Puerto Rico's government.

But because she did, it translated an important report about Hurricane Maria into Spanish so she and most of the island's residents could read it.

"Access to information has always been hard here," Román said.

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

Puerto Rico's governor updated the island's official death toll for victims of Hurricane Maria on Tuesday, hours after independent researchers from George Washington University released a study estimating the hurricane caused 2,975 deaths in the six months following the storm.

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Earlier this year, Victor Barillas decided to get on the HIV prevention pill called Truvada. When taken every day, the pill is nearly 100 percent effective in blocking the transmission of HIV, even through unprotected sex.