Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Health News Florida
Every day, hundreds of sick and injured patients walk into free and charitable clinics around the Tampa Bay area in need of a doctor.Many are suffering from chronic conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure. Some patients were referred to the clinics by staff at hospitals where they landed after years of neglecting to care for treatable conditions.The clinics allow the patients to pay what they can, or nothing at all. They are staffed by doctors and nurses who volunteer their time. They survive off donations and small grants.Many of the patients have jobs but they are living paycheck to paycheck. None have health insurance, either because they do not qualify for Medicaid or can’t afford private coverage. For these patients, the clinics are often their only option for primary care.

Massacre Commission To Discuss Campus Police, Mental Illness

douglas_shooting_vigil.jpg
LESLIE OVALLE / WLRN
/
Students, parents and community members gather for a sunset vigil at Pine Trails Park in honor of the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.

The Florida commission investigating February's high school massacre will discuss the role of campus police officers and changes to the state's mental health laws.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission is scheduled to make recommendations Wednesday on how many school resource officers each campus should have based on enrollment and what the officers' duties should be.

They also will make recommendations for changing the state law that governs the involuntary commitment of anyone who is mentally ill and potentially dangerous.

The commissioners will discuss the response of Deputy Scot Peterson, who was working at Stoneman Douglas when Nikolas Cruz allegedly killed 17 students and staff members.

Video shows the deputy didn't enter the building where the shooting occurred. Critics say he should have tried to shoot Cruz.