Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Aerial Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For South Miami-Dade On Thursday Night

A contractor for Miami-Dade County conducted mosquito control aerial spraying over Wynwood and the surrounding areas on Aug. 4, 2016.
Logan Riely
/
The Florida Channel
Leon County Judge John Cooper on June 30, 2022, in a screen grab from The Florida Channel.

To address a growing population of black salt marsh mosquitoes, Miami-Dade County officials will conduct aerial mosquito spraying Thursday night beginning at 8 p.m.

The salt marsh mosquitoes don’t transmit the Zika virus but do bite humans and can spread heartworm to dogs. County officials say they’ve recently seen large numbers of the mosquitoes in their traps, and have received numerous complaints from callers.

Weather permitting, the aerial spraying will take place over Homestead, Florida City, Redland, West Kendall and areas east of U.S. 1 between Southwest 248th Street and the Rickenbacker Causeway.

Officials plan to spray the pesticide Naled, which sparked protests in Miami Beach last year. Naled is approved for mosquito control by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has been used in Florida for decades, but it’s banned in Europe. And a recently released  study of Chinese babies exposed to the pesticide found some had slight coordination problems around age 9 months.

Critics say they need more evidence that Naled is safe before they’ll be comfortable with its use.

Mosquito control officials in Broward, Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and Monroe counties recently told WLRN they'll be limiting their use of Naled for controlling mosquitoes that carry Zika. They plan to depend on other mosquito control techniques, including an organic larvicide.

Areas in green are scheduled to undergo aerial mosquito spraying Thursday night.
Credit Miami-Dade County
/
The Florida Channel
Areas in green are scheduled to undergo aerial mosquito spraying Thursday night.

Copyright 2020 WLRN 91.3 FM. To see more, visit .

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read.