University of Miami

Time is one of the biggest factors in treating strokes — and a group of South Florida researchers say they’ve found a way to buy stroke patients more time.

If a person has a stroke, the sooner they get treatment, the better their odds are of surviving and of healing without permanent disability. Generally, the thinking has been that patients have a window of no more than six hours for a clot-removal surgery to be effective.

But people don’t always know when they’ve had a stroke — like if it happens while they’re sleeping. And that complicates treatment options. 

A new U.M. student-led research group hopes to start doing the type of analysis and research that simply does not yet exist in Miami-Dade when it comes to understanding the causes and networks around gun violence from a public health perspective.

The new Gun Violence Research Advocacy Program hosted a discussion on Thursday along with trauma surgeons and local gun violence survivors.

“Night after night, it gets tiring and frustrating and overwhelming to meet survivors of gun violence,” said Dr. Rishi Rattan, a trauma surgeon.

Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a new pathway to sentence someone to death Monday. These changes came nearly two months after the U.S. Supreme Court took issue with Florida’s old system for handing down the sentence in the Hurst v. Florida case.

Senate Approves Needle Exchange Program

Feb 25, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

The Florida Senate on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved a proposal that would create a needle-exchange pilot program in Miami-Dade County.

Mario Stevenson is a respected virus expert. He heads the infectious diseases division at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. He’s done pioneering research on HIV.

But until last year he’d barely registered Zika.

“Four months ago,” Stevenson told me, “I thought Zika was an Italian football player.”

There's a disturbing reality about college life today. Roughly one in four students, predominantly women, will become victims of some form of sexual assault, according to a new survey.

  The University of Miami held a public forum on Tuesday about human trafficking in the United States.

 

South Florida's Only Organ Bank Cited For Care Violations

Dec 7, 2015

South Florida's only organ bank is under fire from a national board that oversees policies and practices for organ transplants.

The University of Miami School of Business hosted its yearly health care conference Monday. The main topic of discussion was “disruptive innovation,” which organizer and professor Steven Ullmann says means "to disrupt how we do health care provision in this country."

The Florida Legislature is debating on whether to expand Medicaid.

A doctor and a registered nurse are suing a University of Miami organ bank supervisor who they say assaulted them at a meeting two years ago in front of dozens of other employees, the Miami Herald reports.

University of Miami president Donna Shalala says she’s stepping down next year from the job she’s held since 2001.



Shalala came to the university after leading the federal health agency for eight years and serving as chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 She helped build the national stature of the school's medical school and hospital and increased research budgets.

Frank Nero, former head of the Beacon Council, says even big businessmen were impressed by Shalala

.

When Gov. Rick Scott announced plans to spend tax dollars to boost Florida’s cancer centers, those associated with the Mayo Clinic - Jacksonville welcomed the news, since it treats thousands of cancer patients and is part of the National Cancer Institute system through its headquarters in Minnesota.  But as the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau reports, the pleasant feeling was short-lived.

Florida ranks second in the nation for incidence and deaths from cancer, but it lags behind in National Cancer Institute grant funding, according to the American Cancer Society.

It’s a good-news day for researchers in Florida, with reports on stem cell treatments for heart damage and preclinical trials on an HIV vaccine, both from University of Miami. And for a feel-good story, there’s a TV report on a child raising more than half a million dollars for liver-disease research at University of Florida that might benefit his friend.

Here are some details:

The University of Miami Health System reports hard copies of some of its patient files stored off-site are missing, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel.  The files contain Social Security numbers, insurance company names and other information. UM Health System says the files don’t contain medical records.

MIAMI — A 3-year-old boy is recovering at a Miami hospital after undergoing a five-organ transplant.

Adonis Ortiz underwent the multivisceral transplant in October at the University of Miami Jackson Memorial Medical Center. He received a new liver, pancreas, stomach and small and large intestines.

He and his doctors will attend a press conference on Tuesday. 

A team of pediatric specialists led by University of Miami researcher Steven E. Lipshultz has helped solve part of a complex medical mystery that offers hope to thousands of families whose children suffer from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the Miami Herald reports (paywall alert). 

The newest wave in health care may be as close as your computer.  More hospitals and doctors are using technology, such as Skype, to treat patients, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports.  This can benefit patients who live too far from needed specialists, as well as allowing doctors to consult colleagues when dealing with complex cases.

There are thousands of videos on YouTube with young people trying something called the "cinnamon challenge." People try to swallow a spoonful of cinnamon in less than a minute without any liquid. They sputter, cough and choke from the dry powder. 

Researchers at the University of Miami have identified a new gene they say could help develop specialized treatments for African Americans with Alzheimer’s disease, the Miami Herald reports. 

In the wake of faculty fury over layoffs and budget cuts, the second-highest executive at UM’s Miller School of Medicine has announced plans to step down.