Supreme Court of the United States

Medical Records Case Goes To U.S. Supreme Court

Jun 8, 2017
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Arguing that a Florida Supreme Court ruling “undermines” a federal patient-safety law, a Jacksonville hospital system is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a legal battle about the disclosure of medical records.

Supreme Court Takes Up Birth Control Access — Again

Mar 24, 2016
Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press / Associated Press Photo

On the sixth anniversary of the enactment of the federal Affordable Care Act, the law was back before a seemingly divided Supreme Court Wednesday.

Scott Remains Mum On How To Fix State's Death Penalty

Feb 11, 2016
Florida Department of Corrections

With Florida's death penalty law in limbo due to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Emilee Cope on Wednesday described in chilling detail how her father, Keith, was hog-tied and left for dead back in 2009 when she was a teenager.

FL Abortion Bills Reflect Disputed Texas Law

Nov 17, 2015

Florida lawmakers during the 2016 session could consider abortion-related bills that are similar to a major issue in a closely watched U.S. Supreme Court case.

The Supreme Court late last week said it would hear arguments about a 2013 Texas law that, in part, would require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of the abortion clinics. Supporters say such requirements help ensure patient safety, while critics contend the requirements are designed to make it harder to provide abortions.

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The Supreme Court is wading into its fourth dispute over President Barack Obama's 5-year-old health care overhaul.

Stay Of Execution Lifted For Death Row Inmate

Oct 5, 2015
Florida Supreme Court

The Florida Supreme Court on Friday lifted a stay of execution for a Death Row inmate who argued that the state's lethal-injection method would violate his constitutional rights.

Circuit Judge Upholds Use Of Lethal Injection Drug

Sep 2, 2015

Setting the stage for another Florida Supreme Court death-penalty debate, a Central Florida judge has rejected Death Row inmate Jerry Correll's arguments that one of the drugs in the state's execution protocol could subject the convicted killer to cruel and unusual punishment.

Court To Weigh Allowing Guns In University Housing

Jul 8, 2015

After a high-profile legislative debate this spring about concealed weapons on college campuses, a state appeals court is poised to hear arguments in a dispute about whether guns should be allowed in residence halls and other housing at the University of Florida.

Abortion is back before the Supreme Court, and the justices could signal by the end of June whether they are likely to take up the biggest case on the hot-button subject in nearly a quarter-century.

If the court steps in, the hearing and the eventual ruling would come amid the 2016 presidential campaign.

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Despite White House veto threats, the House is ready to vote to repeal taxes on medical devices and kill a Medicare advisory board that foes say would ration health care as the chamber aims its latest whack at President Barack Obama's health care law.

Survey: Drug Costs Are ‘Unreasonable'

Jun 16, 2015

Nearly three in four Americans say the costs of prescription drugs are “unreasonable,” with most putting the blame on drugmakers, according to a poll released Tuesday.

The survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation found 74 percent of those taking prescription drugs find the costs unreasonable, as do 72 percent of those not taking such drugs. (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

U.S. Supreme Court

The Supreme Court could wipe away health insurance for millions of Americans when it resolves the latest fight over President Barack Obama's health overhaul. But would the court take away a benefit from so many people? Should the justices even consider such consequences?

FL Tops U.S. For Health Subsidies

Jun 3, 2015

More than 10 million people have signed up for private health insurance this year under the federal health law, the administration said Tuesday. That puts the nation finally within reach of coverage for all, but it may not last.

The report from the Department of Health and Human Services comes as dozens of insurers are proposing double-digit premium hikes for next year, raising concerns about future affordability. And the Supreme Court is weighing the legality of subsidized premiums for millions of consumers in more than 30 states. A decision is due around the end of the month.

Private health care providers cannot sue to force states to raise their Medicaid reimbursement rates to keep up with rising medical costs, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

In a 5-4 decision that broke across ideological lines, the justices said medical companies have no private right to enforce federal Medicaid funding laws against states if Congress has not created such a right.

The Supreme Court is considering whether the Americans With Disabilities Act requires police to take special precautions when trying to arrest armed and violent suspects who are mentally ill.

The justices hear arguments Monday in a dispute over how police in San Francisco dealt with a woman suffering from schizophrenia who had threatened to kill her social worker. Police forced their way into Teresa Sheehan's room at a group home and then shot her five times after she came at them with a knife.

HealthCare.gov

Nearly 8 million people could lose up to $24 billion a year in health insurance subsidies in a Supreme Court case threatening President Barack Obama's law, according to a government report released Tuesday.

The estimates by The Associated Press show what's at stake in the case. The biggest potential loser would be Florida, with nearly 1.5 million residents getting an average of $294 a month. That works to $440 million a month currently, or up to $5.2 billion a year for the state. The subsidies are delivered in the form of tax credits.

U.S. Supreme Court

Mixed signals from the Supreme Court have states on edge about the future of health insurance subsidies for millions of Americans. And a summer decision from the justices leaves little time for backup planning.

Many governors, especially Republicans, want the federal government to craft a contingency plan and at least one governor — in Pennsylvania — is pursuing a state exchange, which would make sure his state was able to receive the subsidy.

Scott Drops Welfare Drug Testing Challenge

Mar 5, 2015
Associated Press

After spending at least $300,000 of taxpayer money on legal expenses, Gov. Rick Scott is abandoning his fight to force welfare applicants to undergo mandatory drug tests.

A federal appeals court ruled in December that the state’s mandatory, suspicion-less drug testing of applicants in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, program is an unconstitutional violation of Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures by the government.

U.S. House of Representatives

Congressional Republicans sent a message Monday that they hope the Supreme Court and voters will hear: They have ideas to keep the country's health care system from crumbling if the justices obliterate a bedrock feature of President Barack Obama's heath care law.

The U.S. Supreme Court this week hears a challenge to President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. If successful, the lawsuit would cripple Obama's prized domestic achievement, a program that has brought the U.S. as close as it has ever come to universal health care.

The Affordable Care Act passed Congress in 2010 without a single Republican vote in favor.

An explanation of the legal case:

Four Words Determine the Law's Future

FL Lawyer: Pregnancy Case a Tough Call

Dec 4, 2014
Hollified Legal Centre

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case that could affect how pregnant workers are treated on the job.

Peggy Young was denied a request to go on ‘light duty’ by her employer- UPS. Instead, she was put on unpaid leave and had her health insurance suspended. The supreme court will decide if an employer who accommodates the medical needs of non-pregnant workers must do the same with pregnant workers. A ruling isn’t expected until this Spring.

Winter Park Attorney Travis Hollifield won a similar case before the Florida Supreme Court.

Consumer Guide: SCOTUS Action on ACA Subsidies

Nov 10, 2014

The Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a case on a subject that’s important to millions of people who receive subsidies to help purchase coverage under the health-care law. Friday’s decision follows earlier action in July when two U.S. appeals courts issued conflicting rulings on the issue.  KHN’s Mary Agnes Carey answers some frequently asked questions about those court decisions and how they impact consumers.

Q: What did the Supreme Court do?

Supreme Court Will Hear New ACA Challenge

Nov 7, 2014
U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law that threatens subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums, including Floridians.

The justices said they will review a unanimous federal appeals court ruling that upheld Internal Revenue Service regulations that allow health-insurance tax credits under the Affordable Care Act for consumers in all 50 states. Opponents argue that most of the subsidies are illegal.

Tom Beckwith, a Largo small-business owner, welcomed the news that he would not have to pay for his employees’ access to certain products that he thinks cause abortions. But Arlene Davidson, state policy director for a Jewish women’s group, viewed the news as a major defeat for women.