stroke

Time is one of the biggest factors in treating strokes — and a group of South Florida researchers say they’ve found a way to buy stroke patients more time.

If a person has a stroke, the sooner they get treatment, the better their odds are of surviving and of healing without permanent disability. Generally, the thinking has been that patients have a window of no more than six hours for a clot-removal surgery to be effective.

But people don’t always know when they’ve had a stroke — like if it happens while they’re sleeping. And that complicates treatment options. 

For years, doctors have been warning us that high cholesterol, cigarette smoking, illegal drug use and diabetes increase our chances of having a potentially fatal stroke.

And yet, most of the stroke patients showing up at hospitals from 2004 to 2014 had one or more of these risk factors. And the numbers of people at risk in this way tended to grow among all age groups and ethnicities in that time period.

On July 17, 2014 Kurt Hinrichs, of Gladstone, Mo., went to bed early. As often happens, he woke in the middle of the night. When he tried to get out of bed, he crashed to the floor, which woke his wife, Alice.

"At first it was like, 'What's going on?' " Alice says. "Are you dreaming? Are you sleepwalking?"

Kurt wasn't responding to anything Alice asked him, so she called 911. "I [was] thinking, 'this is a nightmare,' " Kurt says.

Abe Aboraya/WMFE

At a meeting for young stroke survivors at the University of Central Florida’s Aphasia House, it’s craft time.

Here, a few of the young people who have had strokes are chatting. They melt peppermints into cookie cutter shapes. But the crafts are really just pretext for hanging out and chatting with people who know what it’s like to survive a stroke at a young age.

12/30/14 - Today on Topical Currents we discuss the severity, causes and after-effects of stroke. Stroke affects someone in the US every 45-seconds.

Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office

The deaths of two jail inmates -- one in Miami-Dade, the other in Tampa -- have officials investigating how the system failed to protect them.  In the first, Joaquin Cairo was arrested on a misdemeanor and booked into the psychiatric ward of the Miami-Dade jail, where his cell-made allegedly threw him against the furniture, according to the Miami Herald; Cairo died a week later during surgery. U.S.

Lake Worth health policy consultant Paul Gionfriddo, who blogs at Our Health Policy Matters, writes today about two sad cases in which African-Americans died of illnesses that would not have been fatal had they been free. But they were in jail, and were ignored.

Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office

A popular baseball coach who suffered a stroke while driving and swerved off the road into a guardrail needed an ambulance. But sheriff's deputies didn't recognize the slurred speech and inability to move as a stroke, and hauled the driver to jail. 

  

There, the Tampa Bay Times reports, he lay on the floor untreated for 36 hours -- a fatal delay.

A person having a stroke may not be in a war zone, but his or her life is in danger all the same. That's enough to trigger post-traumatic stress disorder in some stroke survivors, researchers say, with symptoms like panic attacks, nightmares and flashes of anger.

This is not one of those posts that is going to beat you up for doing a crummy job exercising, eating better and all the other things you're failing to do to ward off death.

Instead, this post is here to say that if you improve one thing just one teeny bit, it's going to lower your risk of having a stroke. So pick something, and stick to it.

Stroke, which happens when a blood vessel bursts or is blocked in the brain, is a leading cause of death and disability.

Daily Green Tea or Coffee Cuts Stroke Risk

Mar 15, 2013

Whether it's green tea that warms you up, or coffee that gives you that morning lift, a new study finds both can help cut the risk of suffering a stroke.

The study, published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, included 82,369 men and women in Japan.

Researchers found that the more green tea a person drank, the more it reduced the risk of suffering a stroke.

A 63-year-old Elvis impersonator who suffered from a massive stroke was saved by an interventional neurologist at St. Mary’s Medical Center.