sabal trail pipeline

A little over a month after the Sabal Trail Pipeline went online, Central Florida residents are reporting foul-smelling leaks. Despite the sulfur-like scent, the structure is not emitting natural gas. But neighbors and naturalists are still concerned about the impacts.

Residents near a stretch of the Sabal Trail Pipeline in Central Florida are reporting the sulfur-like smell of a gas leak. But the company behind the utility says the emissions are from an odorant leak, not from natural gas.

The Sabal Trail Pipeline is up and running, pumping natural gas some 515 miles from Alabama to Central Florida. But environmental concerns and legal challenges remain.

The Sabal Trail Pipeline is scheduled to start up this week, carrying natural gas from Alabama to Central Florida. Federal regulators approved the activation of the project earlier this summer. But environmentalists are worried about potential impacts to the state’s waterways.

Just days after a federal judge denied another attempt by protesting Native American tribes in North Dakota to halt construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, South Florida has its own pipeline protest going on.

After months of protests the federal government is rerouting the North Dakota Access Pipeline, the Sabal Trail gas pipeline is still undergoing construction. Florida clean energy advocates see the move as a way to generate awareness of another one: Sabal Trail. The group ReThink Energy Florida wants to warn people about the dangers of a pipeline.

Charlie Bellofatto stood on Ashley Drive at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park in Tampa with a tambourine in one hand and a sign in the other.

The Tampa resident and Lakota Tribe member sang the Lakota “Four Directions Song” as he protested the Sabal Trail Transmission Pipeline and a crude oil pipeline being built on native land in the Midwest.

Drilling mud from the Sabal Trail pipeline is leaking into the Withlacoochee River in Georgia.  The spill in the Suwannee River tributary could impact the Floridan aquifer.