rehab

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The CEO of a Delray Beach rehab center raided last year has been accused of paying more than $325,000 in kickbacks to sober home operators who brought in patients for treatment.

When Mario Oikonomides was 38 years old he had a massive heart attack. About a month later, after he'd recuperated from the emergency, his doctors sent him to a cardiac rehabilitation program, where he learned about the role physical activity can play in reducing cardiac risk.

This week: The religious objection to Obamacare's requirement that birth control be free and available makes its way to the Supreme Court again. Baltimore's lead paint problem won't go away.  We've also got a sad tale about the exploitative side of Florida's addiction recovery industry, and some hopeful news that more doctors will soon be ready and able to treat people with substance abuse disorders. Plus, there's a turf war brewing over American livers. 

Per-person Medicare spending, much higher in Florida than all but one other state, has seen a dramatic increase in "post-acute" services -- nursing homes, home-health services, rehabilitation, and so on. And there is no rhyme or reason to the spending; patients who are much alike may be sent to nursing homes in one region, sent home in another.