Red Tide

A couple researchers created fake mangroves in Manasota Key to bring back marine life that was lost from development. Along Florida’s coasts are seawalls-- built to prevent the shoreline from eroding. But that defense sometimes means removing natural habitats. Experts are now trying to turn these solid barriers into thriving ecosystems.

Florida's winter shrimp harvest in the Gulf of Mexico saw "a couple of bad months," fishermen say, on top of reports of low numbers for the iconic stone crab as well. That's all while a troublesome red tide has persisted since late last year

State wildlife biologists rescued a manatee in Southwest Florida waters Wednesday for symptoms resulting from a toxic red tide algal bloom. This seems to be a trend.

Scientists are worried about the the rate at which bottlenose dolphins are washing up on Florida beaches, victims of mass die-offs that appear unrelated.

Tampa Bay Times

Biologists have pointed to Red Tide algae bloom as the reason for so many manatee deaths in Southwest Florida, but now, they’re trying figure out what’s killing so many manatees on the east coast of Florida, the Tampa Bay Times reports. They suspect algae is playing a role, since it has killed off much of the sea grass the manatees eat.