Parkland shooting

There have been nearly 100 threats leveled against schools in the wake of the Valentine's Day shooting at a South Florida High School. Many of those who issued the threats are teens and students themselves. Some have claimed they were just, "joking." Law enforcement officials say they take all threats seriously and many student have been arrested for them, some, are facing felony charges. But whether those charges will stick is another matter, and state prosecutors say there's no law on the books that bans threats against schools. The ones that are in place for general threats of violence, are in need of updates. Second Judicial Circuit State Attorney Jack Campbell says it comes down one question: Was the threat implicit, or explicit?

More than 500 people, classmates and community members filed into Church by the Glades in Coral Springs on Friday to pay their final respects to Helena Ramsay, a young scholar who loved to rescue cats.

Ramsay was one of 17 victims killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High. She had just turned 17 years old in January. 

She was described as a voracious reader and she loved crafting.

At her celebration service at Church by the Glades, her big brother Ellis Ramsay eulogized her.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Along with gun control, the link between mental illness and gun violence has been a major focus in the days since the shooting. NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch put it this way in a CNN town hall this week.

Florida's governor announced plans Friday to put more armed guards in schools and to make it harder for young adults and some with mental illness to buy guns, responding to days of intense lobbying from survivors of last week's shooting at a Florida high school.

JESSICA BAKEMAN / WLRN

The Parkland high school where a former student shot and killed 17 people with an assault-type rifle is reopening for teachers Friday as the community grappled with word that the armed officer on campus did nothing to stop the shooter.

In the wake of the shootings at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, accusations are going around at a fast clip. 

Following last week’s school massacre in Parkland, many are calling for increased gun regulation. But some are also citing mental health issues in America that need to be addressed. 

Hundreds of people gathered in Parkland Wednesday to remember 17-year-old Nick Dworet.

He was one of the 17 people killed by a shooter at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day.

  

Nick loved music. It played Wednesday at Parkland Country Club as friends, family and coaches took turns remembering him.

The handsome teenager who loved Oreos. The joyful nephew. The champion swimmer. The hopeless romantic.

Not even two weeks after a shooter fired more than 100 bullets in the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, students and staff are returning to the campus fearful of emotional triggers that could force them to relive the traumatic event.

Hundreds of people filled Church of the Glades in Coral Springs Thursday to honor slain Stoneman Douglas High School assistant football coach Aaron Feis.

Feis, 37, was killed in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at the school. Witnesses say he was shot as he ran at the shooter and pushed students out of harm’s way.

Ever the coach, Feis’s memorial service opened with the singing of the national anthem.

LESLIE OVALLE / WLRN

After the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida leaders are considering pouring more money into mental health care and experts in the field released some suggestions on Thursday.

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