obesity

In a new study from the University of Florida, Florida Hospital and the Obesity Action Coalition, researchers looked at the health data of 9 million Floridians and found that 37 percent of Floridians are considered obese. That is 10 percent higher than the national average, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Study: 37% Of Floridians Are Obese

Jun 19, 2018

According to a new study from the University of Florida Health, Florida Hospital in Orlando and the Tampa-based nonprofit Obesity Action Coalition, the state's obesity rate is 37.1 percent.

Young women, especially young women of color, tend to get less exercise than their male counterparts, and the disparities worsen after high school ends.

This is the finding of a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

A recent study shows that childhood obesity continues to increase across the country. With few exceptions, the rate of obesity among children is also on the rise at the state and local level.

The national study shows 35.1 percent of children in the U.S. were overweight in 2016. That’s a 4.7 percent increase compared to 2014. Overall, the statistics reflect continuation of a three decades rise in obesity among youth from age 2 to 19.

Locally, there’s reason for optimism if you consider the obesity rate among children in the 2-5 year age range.

In just over four decades, obesity levels in children and teenagers have risen dramatically worldwide, though that rise has been far from uniform. In a new study published online Tuesday, British researchers and the World Health Organization say those levels have plateaued lately in high-income countries, "albeit at high levels," while the rise in obesity rates has only accelerated in regions such as East Asia and Latin America.

Associated Press

The global obesity problem now affects 1 in 10 people in the world, it is rising in countries rich and poor, and in many countries it is increasing faster in children than adults, according to a new study.

iStock/Kaiser Health News

There may be plenty of room for debate about whether some aspects of everyday life cause cancer — whether it’s drinking too much coffee, eating too much sugar or talking too much on a cell phone.

We're living at a time when more than 80 percent of Americans fail to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables. At the same time, many Americans overeat refined grains and sugar.

This may help explain why the obesity rate seems stuck. The most recent estimate is that 36 percent of adults in the U.S. are obese.

Associated Press

New guidelines say weight-loss surgery should become a more routine treatment option for diabetes, even for some patients who are mildly obese.

When it comes to reversing the obesity epidemic, there have been glimmers of hope that the U.S. might be making headway, especially with young children.

Rising Obesity Puts Strain On Nursing Homes

Dec 15, 2015

At 72, her gray hair closely shorn, her days occupied by sewing and television, Wanda Chism seems every bit a typical nursing home patient — but for her size.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force now says all overweight and obese Americans between 40 and 70 years old should get their blood sugar levels tested.

The advisory group's previous recommendation, drafted in 2008, made no mention of weight, instead suggesting that doctors routinely test the blood sugar of patients who have high blood pressure, another risk factor for Type 2 diabetes.

Biking Behind Bars: Female Inmates Battle Weight Gain

Oct 11, 2015

The gym at Riverside Correctional Facility in Philadelphia is through the metal detector, two heavy doors and down the hall.

There's a basketball court like one you'd see at any high school, except there's a corrections officer on guard near the 3-point line.

Sixteen stationary bikes are set up in a half-circle in the corner. On bike No. 2, Lakiesha Montgomery, 32, from Philadelphia, is pedaling fast and singing along to the Nicki Minaj song "Fly."

"I didn't think I'd be able to keep up; I'm not the skinniest thing in the bunch," she says.

You've heard it a million times: The hours we spend sitting in front of our computers, sitting in front of the TV and sitting just about everywhere else are adding up. We are sitting ourselves to death.

So it came as welcome news when we read last week that just 10 minutes — 10 minutes! — of walking after sitting for a long period of time can restore the damage to our vascular system.

Tampa General Hospital & USF Health Bariatric Center

Many people struggle with their weight, and former athletes are no exception.

But athletes who gain weight once they retire are at a higher risk for serious medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure. That's why four retired NFL players, including two from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, teamed up as part of a weight loss study by Tampa General Hospital and the USF Health Bariatric Center to tackle their obesity.

Abuse. Drugs. Mental health issues.

It’s tough enough for anyone to talk about those problems. It can be even harder for teens facing them for the first time.

Few Obese Seniors Using Medicare Benefit

Nov 20, 2014
Associated Press

Three years ago, the Obama administration offered hope to millions of overweight seniors when it announced Medicare would offer free weight-loss counseling.

Officials estimated that about 30 percent of seniors are obese and therefore eligible for counseling services, which studies have shown improve the odds of significant weight loss.

Lottie Watts / WUSF

Health experts say changing your eating habits is one way to avoid becoming overweight or obese.

But anyone who has tried a new diet knows it can be really tough -- even when you're facing serious health consequences. So some people are trying out free cooking classes with a professional chef to help make better choices about what they eat.

Associated Press

Florida has the 37th highest obesity rate among adults, up from its last ranking of 40th, according to a report from Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  

Florida's increase from 25.2 percent in 2012 to 26.4 percent in 2013 is not statistically significant, according to the annual report that's now named “The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America." For the past decade, it was called the "F as in FAT" report.

Poor health is no excuse to avoid serving time, two health care professionals convicted in separate pill mill schemes have learned.

The Tampa Bay Times reports that both Dr. Ronald John Heromin, 58, of Brandon and pharmacist Steven Goodman, 70, of Treasure Island tried to use physical ailments to alleviate sentences related to their federal court convictions.

The Food and Drug Administration says it is reviewing whether the maker of the most widely used emergency contraceptive pill needs to change its label in light of new evidence that it doesn't work to prevent pregnancy in overweight or obese women.

Obesity is hurting the nation's health, but the pain is not evenly spread. Those who have low incomes are the most dependent on processed foods sweetened with high fructose corn syrup, a product kept cheap through taxpayer subsidies to the corn industry.

Meanwhile, writes public-health specialist and consumer advocate Gary J. Stein, the cost of healthier and leaner foods -- vegetables, fruits and dairy products -- keeps going up. They become less and less affordable to families who need them most.

Tampa Metropolitan YMCA

For the first time in a long time, Florida's children aren't getting heavier.

The Centers for Disease Control credits the drop, at least in part, to First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" campaign. 

According to the latest "F as in Fat" report from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Florida still has a serious obesity problem. 

Although the rate decreased slightly from 26.6 percent in 2011 to 25.2 percent in 2012, researchers say the lower numbers aren't statistically significant. They call the changes a "leveling off," not a decrease.

Across the country, every state except for Arkansas had a slightly lower adult obesity rate. Researchers caution there's still a long way to go, and note people who are obese are at risk for much worse health outcomes and higher health costs. 

"The numbers were essentially flat from last year," said Jeff Levi, executive director of the Trust for America's Health. "That's the first time  in the 10 years we've been doing this report, and in the many years the CDC has been following theses trends, that we've seen that kind of leveling off, so that's a very hopeful sign."

To find a cure for obesity-related diabetes.  The three-year agreement was announced Tuesday, the Orlando Sentinel reports.  Research will take a new path; rather than looking for another form of insulin or other diabetes medication, researchers will look for a way to possibly cure the disease, which affects 10 percent of American adults.

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

Jul 26, 2013

Don't try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good. Florida researchers have evidence that discriminating against fat people only makes them fatter.

The decision by the Boy Scouts to not let scouts participate in its National Jamboree if they have a BMI higher than 40 is disgraceful, according to a column in the Broward Palm Beach New Times. The Obesity Action Coalition is urging the Boy Scouts of America to let all scouts go to the jamboree, regardless of their size. 

A multi-year study finds that Americans -- and Floridians -- are exercising more than in the past, yet still getting fatter. In a similar vein, we're living longer, but the extra years aren't healthy ones.

Those seemingly contradictory results, which show public health is a complicated business, emerge from a sweeping 25-year study of the nation's health published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The analysis was done by Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Obesity Is A 'Disease.' Now What?

Jun 21, 2013

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CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Obesity has long been recognized as a public health problem. But this week, the American Medical Association, the nation's largest professional organization of physicians, has taken the step of officially recognizing obesity as a disease.

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