NOAA

Florida is waiting on Congress to authorize two efforts that could help address algal blooms plaguing the state's coastal and inland waterways.

State wildlife officials reported this past Friday that elevated levels of the organism Karenia brevis are persisting along Florida's gulf coast, which is creating toxic red tide algae blooms from Pinellas County down to Collier County.

The federal government, with the help of Mote Marine Laboratory, is continuing to investigate a significant spike in dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico -- and they want to know if red tide is playing a part in it.

Anyone interested in moves by the Trump Administration to relax restrictions on offshore drilling can have their voices heard by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As part of a series of listening sessions across the county, NOAA is coming to USF St. Petersburg at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, to talk about the health and status of our coastal waters.

As Florida struggles with 'red tide' algae blooms on the west coast and blue-green algae in inland waterways, a federal program to help communities deal with harmful algae outbreaks is set to lose its Congressional authorization at the end of September.

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

NASA Worldview / Wikimedia

Jennifer WeeksThe Conversation

(THE CONVERSATION) June 1 marks the start of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, with some communities still rebuilding after last year’s largest storms.

Scientists are worried about the the rate at which bottlenose dolphins are washing up on Florida beaches, victims of mass die-offs that appear unrelated.

Florida #1 in Lightning Deaths, Fishing the Most Lethal

Jun 24, 2013

Florida ranks number one in the country in lightning strikes per square mile. So, it should be no surprise that Florida leads in lightning deaths as well.

But what’s eye opening to John Jensenius, a lightning specialist with the National Weather Service, is that 82 percent of the lightning deaths are male.

Also surprising is what they were doing when hit by lightning.