National Institutes of Health

Doctors at the National Institutes of Health say they've apparently completely eradicated cancer from a patient who had untreatable, advanced breast cancer.

The case is raising hopes about a new way to harness the immune system to fight some of the most common cancers. The methods and the patient's experience are described Monday in a paper published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Wanted: A million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science.

Do Concussions Cause Parkinson’s? One Study Thinks So

Apr 25, 2018
Flickr Creative Commons

A study of veterans’ medical records over the past decade, found those with traumatic brain injuries had a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s Disease. 

By the time Ann Marie Owen, 61, turned to marijuana to treat her pain, she was struggling to walk and talk. She was also hallucinating.

For four years, her doctor prescribed a wide range of opioids for transverse myelitis, a debilitating disease that caused pain, muscle weakness and paralysis.

The drugs not only failed to ease her symptoms, they hooked her.

When her home state of New York legalized marijuana for the treatment of select medical ailments, Owens decided it was time to swap pills for pot. But her doctors refused to help.

Neil Smith / Flickr

The phone calls come — from fellow scientists and desperate strangers — with a single question for the alcohol chief at the National Institutes of Health: Where can my loved one find good care to get sober?

This story was updated on May 24 to clarify include new information on proposed cuts to Medicaid.

The proposed budget unveiled Tuesday by the Trump administration doubles down on major cuts to biomedical research; programs to fight infectious disease outbreaks; health care for the poor, elderly and disabled; and prevention of HIV/AIDS.

Castor Protests NIH Funding Cuts

Apr 11, 2017

The University of South Florida has received more than $260 million dollars in federal funding from the National Institutes of Health. President Trump’s budget proposes slashing the NIH by close to 20 percent.  

After multiple recent studies showing that feeding peanut-containing foods to infants can reduce the risk of peanut allergies, there are new federal guidelines for parents about when to start feeding their infants such foods.

Updated Dec. 1, 9:05 a.m.: The House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to approve the 21st Century Cures Act, a sprawling bill to fund medical research and revamp how drugs and medical devices are approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Senate GOP Drops Push To 'Defund Obamacare'

Jun 8, 2016
Lynn Hatter/WFSU / WFSU

Republicans controlling the Senate are abandoning an effort to use their power over the federal purse strings to block implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

This year, the National Institutes of Health received $2 billion more for medical research than in previous years, bringing its national funding to $32 billion.

But that's not enough, researchers say. 

WMFE

A University of Central Florida College of Nursing professor has landed a nearly $500,000 grant to study chemotherapy side effects in older adults.

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Florida International University a $12.7 million grant to study substance abuse and adolescent brain development.

Larry Goldstein is trying to find drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. A biologist in cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Goldstein also just started testing something he hopes will enable paralyzed people to walk again.

For both lines of research, he's using cells from aborted fetuses.

"The fetal cells are vital at this time because, to our knowledge, they have the best properties for the kinds of experiments that we need to do," Goldstein says.

Associated Press

Holding out the promise of major medical breakthroughs, President Barack Obama on Friday called on Congress to approve spending in medical research that tailors treatment to an individual's genes.

Obama wants $215 million for what he's calling a precision medicine initiative that moves away from one-size-fits-all treatments. The ambitious goal: Scientists will assemble databases of about a million volunteers to study their genetics — and other factors such as their environments and the microbes that live in their bodies — to learn how to individualize care.

Though the United States is still leading the world in research related to diseases, it is rapidly losing its edge, according to an analysis in the American Medical Association's flagship journal JAMA.

If you look at biomedical research around the globe, the United States funded 57 percent of that work a decade ago. The U.S. share has since dropped to 44 percent, according to the study published online Tuesday.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

For Americans wondering why President Barack Obama hasn’t forced all states to follow a single, national rule for isolating potential Ebola patients, the White House has a quick retort: Talk to the Founding Fathers.

When Gov. Rick Scott announced plans to spend tax dollars to boost Florida’s cancer centers, those associated with the Mayo Clinic - Jacksonville welcomed the news, since it treats thousands of cancer patients and is part of the National Cancer Institute system through its headquarters in Minnesota.  But as the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau reports, the pleasant feeling was short-lived.

Florida ranks second in the nation for incidence and deaths from cancer, but it lags behind in National Cancer Institute grant funding, according to the American Cancer Society.

More students are illegally using medicine meant to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder to give them a boost when studying, the Orlando Sentinel reports. It’s called “academic doping,” and at the University of Central Florida, 10 percent of students admit to illegally using the stimulants meant to help with ADHD.

BP says the amount of oil and dispersant most cleanup workers were exposed to after the Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010 was “safe,” the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Tampa Tribune

University of South Florida and Moffitt Cancer Center say sequestration budget cuts are hurting their work, since most of their grants come from the National Institutes of Health, the Tampa Tribune reports. Moffitt, which expects to lose more than half its budget for cancer research, says it expects delays and layoffs.  

 

The National Institutes of Health has approved a $7-million, five-year grant to Mayo Clinic Jacksonville to boost its study on Parkinson’s disease, according to the Florida Times-Union.