Medicaid

Medicare Won't Pursue Overpayments

Jun 2, 2014

Medicare spent $6.7 billion too much for office visits and other patient evaluations in 2010, according to a new report from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

But in its reply to the findings, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), which runs Medicare, said it doesn't plan to review the billings of doctors who almost always charge for the most expensive visits because it isn't cost effective to do so.

WellCare Health Plans

The interim CEO of WellCare Health Plans says he’s trying to move past the company’s troubles and focus on expanding its Medicare, Medicaid and prescription drug business, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Dave Gallitano, the WellCare board chairman who led the ouster of the Tampa-based firm's most recent CEO last November, has made significant changes the past six months.

Pediatricians are worried the privatization of the state’s Children’s Medical Services program will leave some children without services, the News Service of Florida reports.

Medicaid coverage for these children changes to pre-paid health plans on Aug. 1. Some pediatricians think the transition has been poorly planned and could leave as many as 70,000 children without medical coverage.

In a column in the Tampa Bay Times, John Romano writes that more than a year ago, lawmakers claimed they were going to look for a solution to help low-income Floridians get health coverage after the House  turned down  a Senate bill to accept $51 billion in federal funds -- money made available through an alternative to  Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

With 800,000 uninsured Floridians stuck in the “coverage gap” - too much money to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough for subsidies under the Affordable Care Act - the focus is turning on what can be done to help. 

The Florida Legislature turned down the option of accepting $51 billion in federal funds that would have provided them health coverage last year. With only one week left in this year's session, those in the gap - 20 percent of Florida’s uninsured - will most likely be left hanging.

A Marion County woman accused of defrauding Medicaid said in an affidavit she was caught up in living well and "got greedy," the Ocala Star-Banner reports.

CBS Miami

A plan to redistribute federal money among all of Florida’s hospitals will be delayed at least a year, legislators announced at a joint Health and Human Service budget conference committee meeting on Monday.

The so-called “tiering” plan would be a significant blow to the state’s 14 safety-net hospital systems, such as Miami’s Jackson Health System, which had been bracing for a $140 million cut to its budget, and the state’s two free-standing children’s hospitals, which were prepared to lose a combined $17.6 million.

  All session long, Florida's legislative leaders have frustrated advocates for the poor, as well as much of the business community, by declining to talk about the billions of federal dollars for Medicaid expansion that the state is forgoing.

While 7 million Americans enrolled for health insurance before the March 31 Affordable Care Act deadline,  Charlene Dill wasn’t one of them.

The young mother of three collapsed and died from a treatable heart condition on March 21. She fell into  Florida’s health care gap; her income from part-time commission-based jobs was just $9,000, too poor for Affordable Care Act subsidies, the Orlando Weekly magazine reports.

Medicaid.gov

Florida Medicaid received word Friday evening that federal officials have authorized a $2 billion hospital fund for indigent care starting July 1 and an extra $200 million for the state’s medical schools.

Justin Senior, Florida’s Medicaid director, said the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services okayed $2.2 billion for the “Low Income Pool (LIP),” which is used to support “safety-net” hospitals and clinics that treat a lot of Medicaid patients. The LIP is a combination of local and state funds that draw down federal match.

Getting rid of the five-year waiting period for children of legal immigrants to get health coverage through KidCare will improve health outcomes and save money, writes Cindy Arenberg Seltzer, president/CEO of the Children's Services Council of Broward County, in a column in the South Florida Sun Sentinel. Seltzer is urging lawmakers to pass measures that would eliminate the waiting period and give KidCare to more than 25,000 children.  

Florida’s Republican lawmakers remain staunchly opposed to expanding Medicaid — a system they’ve repeatedly said is too expensive and doesn’t improve health outcomes. Yet Florida’s Medicaid rolls are expanding under the Affordable Care Act whether Florida likes it or not.

That’s because people trying to sign up for health insurance under President Obama’s new health law are finding out — to their surprise — that they qualify for Medicaid, the federal health insurance program for the poor.

Broward County Commissioners are considering a $1.29 million incentive package for an unnamed health insurance company wanting to hire 265 employees in Sunrise.

The House Health & Human Services Committee on Thursday approved HB 27, which would take away $200 million in children’s dental services from the Medicaid HMOs and other plans that have already contracted with the state to provide complete medical and dental care for patients of all ages.

The bill, sponsored by state Rep. Jose Diaz, R-Miami, passed 11 to 6.

Does the Affordable Care Act permit the government to seize assets after Medicaid patients age 55 or older die? According to the Florida Times-Union, states have had the option to do that since the Medicaid program started in 1965.

A new drug hailed as a breakthrough against hepatitis C comes at a price that  puts treatment out of reach for most who need the medication -- $84,000 for a standard 12-week course of Sovaldi, manufactured by Gilead Sciences.

Raising hopes that Medicaid expansion isn't as dead as it seems, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson told Florida House Democrats on Wednesday that he is working on a solution with federal health officials -- but he wouldn't say what it was.

As The Florida Current reports, Nelson also said the state budget for 2014-15, which is being written right now, could lose $600 million in federal funds if the state doesn't compromise. He said it will be "a real shocker," but didn't elaborate.

Florida’s Medicare contractor, First Coast Service Options in Jacksonville, recently announced plans to limit coverage for follow-up drug tests, and is accepting public comment.

Behind-the-scenes negotiations between insurers are powering Florida Medicaid’s transition to statewide managed care plans, the Naples Daily News reports (paywall alert).

The Agency for Health Care Administration last year awarded contracts to 17 companies in 11 regions across Florida. That prompted 64 different legal challenges from insurers that stood to lose out on a share of an estimated $80-billion pie.  

Federal agencies are teaming up to improve oversight of nursing homes, a practice that now misses a third of the cases of substandard care, according to Kaiser Health News.

A report published this month by the non-profit Florida TaxWatch predicts significant cost savings if Florida removes the barriers to telemedicine.

The policy group's report said Florida could save more than $1 billion a year by expanding the use of telemedicine by revising current law. It criticizes policies that discourage use of telemedicine, specifically the limitations on private reimbursement requirements and Medicaid payments.

In the Miami Herald, Fabiola Santiago writes that it's negligent for lawmakers to reject more than $51 billion in federal money to provide health insurance to poor Floridians. She calls House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, a “fool” and a “hypocrite” in his fight against Medicaid expansion and resistance to alternatives drawn up by Republicans.

No one questions that assisted living facilities need to be regulated - or if they do question it, they’re being quiet about it. But there’s disagreement on how the regulation should be carried out, especially how much the fines should be.

A South Florida health plan ramped up its legal challenge to the state’s decision to award a Medicaid managed-care contract to a competitor, the News Service of Florida reports.

Care Access PSN (for "provider service network") wants the 4th District Court of Appeal to block the state's contract with Prestige Health Choice for patients in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties.

'Moral Monday' Ushers in 2014 Session

Mar 4, 2014
AP

With the 2014 legislative session opening Tuesday, about 400 Floridians rallied in the Capitol Courtyard for what was billed as "Moral Monday." 

Speakers at the rally called for lawmakers to expand Medicaid, stop the state's voter purge and roll back the “stand your ground” self-defense law.

None is likely to occur during the impending legislative session, but the protestors vowed to carry their concerns to the polls in the midterm elections this fall.

Florida’s 2014 Legislative session will start with the typical benign tone that comes during an election year. But it’s unclear if the Republican-led legislature can keep things status quo, the Hearld/Times Tallahassee Bureau reports.

The funding formula in Florida’s Medicaid reform law means hospitals across the state will see millions of dollars in cuts, the Tampa Bay Times reports, while a handful will see funding increase (paywall alert).

 

The federal government intends to fine Florida for what it describes as a violation of the Social Security Act -- limiting Medicaid patients' emergency room visits to six a year -- the Tampa Bay Times reports.  

In December 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services  rejected the plan from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration to cap the visits.

Because of the U.S. Supreme Court decision and Florida’s anti-Obamacare politics, legal immigrants will qualify for subsidies on health plans in this state even as citizens under the poverty level get turned away. 

As The Associated Press reports from Miami, many low-income uninsured are baffled that they don’t qualify for a tax credit.

 Though controversy over health care reform continues, America’s governors appear to agree on one thing: the Affordable Care Act is here to stay, according to the Associated Press

This weekend in Washington D.C., Republican and Democratic governors said a complete repeal of the law would be impractical, especially since states already are implementing the ACA with varying degrees of success, the AP reports.

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