lawsuit

The City of Jacksonville is moving forward with plans to launch a lawsuit against pharmaceutical companies for their role in the city’s worsening opioid addiction crisis.

The city of Jacksonville is considering suing prescription drug makers for deceptive marketing.

One city councilman believes pharmaceutical companies are complicit in Northeast Florida’s opioid addiction epidemic.


Local officials and cannabis advocates are chafing under Florida’s latest medical marijuana legislation.  But they’re reacting to the new regime in different ways.

Last year, the pesticide Naled was one of several tools officials used to control mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. Dr. Michael Hall was one of many Miami Beach residents who protested, saying Naled exposure leads to symptoms like headaches and nausea. He and other protesters also expressed fears the pesticide could have longer-term health effects.

The state of Ohio has sued five major drug manufacturers for their role in the opioid epidemic. In the lawsuit filed Wednesday, state Attorney General Mike DeWine alleges these five companies "helped unleash a health care crisis that has had far-reaching financial, social, and deadly consequences in the State of Ohio."

Named in the suit are:

  • Purdue Pharma
  • Endo Health Solutions
  • Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and subsidiary Cephalon
  • Johnson & Johnson and subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals

wp paarz / Flickr

When an individual goes up against a multibillion-dollar company, odds of prevailing are slim.

But every now and then, justice smiles on the little guy. It’s smiling on Tampa internist Jose Ignacio Lopez, who won $1.5 million in a slander suit against a global health-finance powerhouse.

Twenty states are accusing a group of generic drug makers of conspiring to keep the prices on an antibiotic and a diabetes medication artificially high. And the state attorneys general say the lawsuit filed in federal court in Connecticut Thursday may be just the beginning of a much larger legal action.

Most voters in the Florida Keys said in a Nov. 8 referendum that they were in favor of releasing genetically modified mosquitoes in the Keys.

Lawyers representing 142 retired NFL players filed a federal lawsuit against the NFL Monday in Fort Lauderdale.

They want the league to recognize CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, as an occupational hazard that should be covered by workers compensation.

Tony Gaiter, 42, is the lead plaintiff in the suit.

He played for the University of Miami, before going on to play for the New England patriots and the San Diego Chargers.

The American Health Care Association, an industry group that represents most nursing homes in the U.S., has filed a lawsuit against the federal government over a new rule that protects the right of patients and their families to sue nursing homes in court.

Appeals Court Orders Hearing Over UF Veterinary Records

Oct 5, 2016
WMFE

An appeals court Tuesday ordered a circuit judge to hold a hearing in a public-records lawsuit involving research conducted on animals at the University of Florida.

Court Rejects $8M Verdict In Asbestos Case

Sep 15, 2016
wp paarz / Flickr

Pointing to problems with expert witnesses, an appeals court Wednesday rejected an $8 million verdict in a case filed by a man who said he suffered mesothelioma because of exposure to asbestos in cigarette filters and in other products.

Associated Press

In 2008, Charlotte County Jail guards doused Stephen McNeeley, who has schizophrenia, with three cans of pepper spray, strapped him into a restraint chair and left him burning for more than three hours.

Whether they violated the Eight Amendment, which protects against cruel and unusual punishment, is at the heart at a trial starting Thursday in federal court in Fort Myers, reports The Naples Daily News.

Appeal Dropped In Death Of Escaped Patient

Jul 29, 2016
WMFE

The estate of a woman who was killed on Interstate 75 after escaping from a psychiatric hospital is dismissing an appeal in a lawsuit against Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, according to a notice filed Thursday in the Florida Supreme Court.

The family of a woman who died outside a hospital after she was forcibly removed by police has filed a lawsuit against the hospital, two of its former employees, the City of Blountstown and a former Blountstown Police officer.

Florida has no plans to stop offering kosher meals to prisoners, but corrections officials don't want a federal judge telling them they have to keep serving up the special diet, which consists largely of sardines and peanut butter.

A decade-long lawsuit over Florida’s Medicaid program has cost taxpayers millions, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Supreme Court To Take Up Tobacco Damages Dispute

May 27, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to take up a case in which an appeals court rejected a $30 million punitive-damages award against R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co, according to an online docket. 

Lawsuits Filed Over Closure of Broward Re-Entry Center

May 3, 2016
GOOGLE MAPS

Inmates are named as plaintiffs in three lawsuits challenging a Florida Department of Corrections decision to close a re-entry center in Broward County.

The lawsuits, filed late Monday in Leon County circuit court, are part of a dispute in which contractor Bridges of America is seeking to prevent the shutdown of facilities in Broward and Manatee counties.

Settlement Reached In Battle Over Children’s Health Care

Apr 6, 2016
AP

After a court fight that lasted more than a decade, the state and groups representing pediatricians and dentists have settled a class-action lawsuit about care provided to children in Florida's Medicaid program.

The settlement, released Tuesday, came about 15 months after a federal judge found that Florida's history of low reimbursement payments to doctors led to a lack of access to care for many poor children. But the agreement also came after the state argued that an overhaul of the Medicaid system had effectively made the case moot.

Court Backs DCF In Nursing Home Expenses Case

Apr 6, 2016

An appeals court Monday sided with the Florida Department of Children and Families in a dispute about expenses for a woman who went into a Tallahassee nursing home after suffering a spinal-cord injury in an accident.

Florida Prisons Sued Over Treatment Of Disabled Inmates

Jan 27, 2016
Associated Press

A group representing disabled inmates has filed a federal lawsuit accusing Florida prison officials of discriminating against prisoners who are deaf, blind or confined to wheelchairs, in violation of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act.

Hearing: Did Chinese Drywall Company Hold Back Information

Dec 15, 2015

A federal judge will hear closing arguments Tuesday about whether a Chinese drywall manufacturer held back information about its U.S. sales by failing to disclose a former official's whereabouts.

As Dean Cole's dementia worsened, he began wandering at night. He'd even forgotten how to drink water. His wife, Virginia, could no longer manage him at home. So after much agonizing, his family checked him into a Minnesota nursing home.

Prison System, Contractor Accused Of Denying Inmate Surgeries

Sep 21, 2015
Florida Department of Corrections

Lawyers for Florida inmates have filed a class-action lawsuit against the Department of Corrections and prison health-care provider Corizon, alleging that the state agency and the company are denying hernia operations to save money.

Questionable salaries of several Broward Health cardiologists is a central complaint in a whistleblower lawsuit that led to a recent $69.5 million settlement, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reports. The federal government challenged the hours reported by “medical directors” at Broward Health, according to the Sun Sentinel.

The Justice Department has reached a $69.5 million settlement with the North Broward Hospital District in South Florida, which was accused in a lawsuit of having improper financial relationships with doctors who referred patients to the district.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce says Florida’s lawsuit climate is among the worst in the nation—for businesses. The business lobby association is pushing state legislators to crack down on trial lawyers—including one big name in the industry.

WMFE

 A Florida community college says it will no longer have ultrasound technician students practice an invasive vaginal procedure on each other after two of them filed a lawsuit.

Valencia College’s president said in a statement Tuesday that students will use simulators when practicing transvaginal ultrasound scanning.

President Sandy Shugart says an independent expert reviewed the program last summer after the students complained and concluded the procedure was done safely and professionally at the school.

WMFE

Two Valencia College students in Orlando have filed a lawsuit alleging students were "browbeat" into having pelvic ultrasounds performed on them.

Valencia College hasn’t been served the lawsuit, filed late last week, but defended its use of student volunteers.

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