hunger

The Children’s Home Society of Florida has announced it is hosting a “Farm Share Food Giveaway” event at Wilkinson Jr. High School in Middleburg on Thursday, Aug. 9, which is expected to help feed more than 1,000 Clay County families with fresh produce and groceries.

More hungry families in Jacksonville will get the food they need thanks to Feeding Northeast Florida and a $30,000 grant from United Healthcare.

A Tampa restaurateur is trying to ensure that no one in Tampa Bay goes without a place to have a Thanksgiving meal.

In Florida, 15 percent of families don’t know where they’re going to get their next meal. When you look at children alone, that number increases to almost a quarter who are food insecure, according to Feeding America, one of the largest networks of food banks in the country.

There's a small-scale charity movement starting to take hold in neighborhoods across the country. Think of those "little free library" boxes, but with a twist: These are small pantries stocked with free food and personal care items like toothbrushes and diapers for people in need.

They're found near churches, outside businesses and in front of homes. Maggie Ballard, who lives in Wichita, Kan., calls hers a "blessing box."

  It’s a problem that affects 700,000 people in the ten-county Tampa Bay area: food insecurity.

Thomas Mantz, the Executive Director of the group Feeding Tampa Bay says food insecurity is when people like you and me don’t have consistent access to food due to a lack of money or other resources. 

Nearly a quarter of Gadsden County residents don't know where their next meal is coming from. Leon County is close behind with 22 percent of residents classified as "food insecure". That's according a recent report from the group, Feeding America. The organization's study shows hunger is widespread in the Big Bend.

In Sunlit Paradise, Seniors Go Hungry

May 28, 2015
Ariel Min/PBS NewsHour

It wasn’t until the Maffuccis found themselves living on cups of coffee, and coffee alone, that they finally called a food pantry for help.

The couple had sold their suburban New Jersey home where they had raised three children and set out to pursue the glossy dream of an easy-going retirement in sunny southwest Florida.

But Mina and Angelo Maffucci quickly ran out of money—overtaken by illness, bad luck and an economic crisis that claimed their dream home in Naples to foreclosure. They soon found themselves staring at an empty cupboard.