health law

Cheap Health Insurance / Flickr

There are many recommendations for preventive care in the health law. Services recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force have to be provided without charging anything out of pocket.

 As the April 15 tax deadline nears, people who got help paying for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law are seeing the direct effect on their refunds — hundreds of dollars, for better or worse.

The law offers tax credits so people without access to job-based health insurance can buy private coverage. Because these subsidies are tied to income, consumers must accurately estimate what they will make for the coming year.

That's been a challenge for millions of people.

Solid economic growth will help the federal budget deficit shrink this year to its lowest level since President Barack Obama took office, according to congressional estimates released Monday.

The Congressional Budget Office also projects a 14 percent drop in the number of U.S. residents without health insurance, largely because of Obama's health law.

ACA Health Premiums Up 10-15% in FL

Nov 17, 2014

The average monthly premiums for Affordable Care Act "silver plans" increased by double digits in most Florida counties for 2015, according to an Associated Press analysis.

In their analysis, AP reporters Mike Schneider in Orlando and Kelli Kennedy in Miami  compared premiums after averaging them for all silver plans, without taking subsidies into account. 

Florida, Texas Expand Medicaid – For Kids

Sep 29, 2014

Republican lawmakers in Florida and Texas snubbed the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion for adults, but their states did broaden the program this year -- for school-age children.

Most lawmakers aren’t going the way of Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Lakeland, who has purchased a private health insurance plan and rejected a subsidy to buy coverage on the federal marketplace created under the Affordable Care Act. 

As the Tampa Bay Times reports, the subsidy pays for up to 75 percent of premiums for members of Congress.  The perk became a target in the political fight over the implementation of the law.  

Getting people to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act remains an uphill battle in much of Florida.

Politicians in the state erected roadblocks to the law from the beginning — from joining in the 2010 lawsuit to thwart the law to placing restrictions on what insurance helpers called navigators can tell people seeking advice.

US Rep. Ted Yoho of Florida, one of the Tea Party Republicans trying to strangle the health law, compared those in his coalition to “Rosa Parks, Lech Walesa and Martin Luther King” in a speech on Thursday, the New York Times reports. The leader of the minority Democrats, Nancy Pelosi, called the group “legislative arsonists” who have “hijacked” their party. A vote is expected on Friday. 

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act rallied hundreds of conservatives at a Tampa hotel Wednesday night with a call for the Republican House to strip funds for the law out of next year's budget.

The budget vote is scheduled for right after Labor Day, in time for the 2014 fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1.

"Can we defund Obamacare? Yes, we can!" declared Mike Needham, CEO of the host group Heritage Action for America. The crowd applauded heartily at his use of President Barack Obama's campaign slogan.

As fitness expert and personal trainer Marilynn Preston relaxed during a pedicure, she listened to the nail technician lament her confusion about the Affordable Care Act. In a column in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Peterson explains how she eased the woman’s fears with facts about the law. 

Associated Press

Members of the all-Republican Florida Cabinet -- Gov. Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam and Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater -- have approved disclosure forms that insurance companies will need to send out to policyholders if their premiums will be affected by the federal Affordable Care Act, the Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau reports.

Gerd Altmann

When it comes to the Affordable Care Act, there's a ton of confusion. At Health News Florida, we're here to help you get the answers you need.

We'd like to get your questions for an upcoming Florida Matters, WUSF's weekly public affairs show.

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, a Florida Democrat, released a letter to Gov. Rick Scott saying the bill that suspends Florida from setting health insurance rates for two years is “unbelievable and unconscionable.”  

How to trim Medicare?

Nov 16, 2012

The White House will want to protect Medicaid and the health law from budget cuts, making Medicare a likely target. Kaiser Health News lays out options.

Gov. Scott, who still ruled out cooperation on "ObamaCare" as of Wednesday, changed his tune Friday, issuing the statement: "Just saying 'no' is not an answer."

Obama, health law win

Nov 7, 2012

President Obama's re-election means the survival of the Affordable Care Act, which Florida's Republican leaders fought intensely.

When Florida's legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act failed in June, it placed increased importance on the outcome of today's election. The fate of the law -- and millions of uninsured -- rides on the vote tally.