FWC

Florida wildlife officials say lionfish harvesters are crucial to getting rid of the invasive species. But, lionfish removal divers are urged to safely remove the fish without causing any natural habitat damage.

It can be hard to avoid lawn mowers, bulldozers and curious dogs if you spend a lot of time in a hole in the ground. 

That's the habitat of the Florida burrowing owl, which as of January is officially classified as a threatened species. 

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) held a meeting in Lauderhill on Thursday to get public input on how to create new development guidelines to protect the owls in light of their new status.

FWC Asks The Public To Report Fish Kills

Jun 21, 2017

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission wants the public to report all fish kills this summer, when high temperatures and hurricanes threaten Florida’s marine and freshwater wildlife.

Despite a months-long season for red snapper in state waters off Florida and other Gulf states, fisherman across the Gulf of Mexico are gearing up to protest a brief three-day opening to catch the prized fish in federal Gulf waters. Fishermen argue a short opening hurts businesses and hampers anglers across the Gulf, but fishery managers say a small window is important to preserve a species still recovering from overfishing.

This week is National Safe Boating Week, and with Florida wildlife officials expecting increased turnout on the water for the Memorial Day weekend, they’re hoping boaters will wear life jackets.

As Florida’s Bald Eagle population continues to increase, state wildlife officials are considering changes to the state’s management plan for the iconic raptors. 

State wildlife biologists rescued a manatee in Southwest Florida waters Wednesday for symptoms resulting from a toxic red tide algal bloom. This seems to be a trend.

Wikimedia Commons

Florida wildlife authorities may expand protected areas for some of the state’s most iconic and imperiled bird species like roseate spoonbills and brown pelicans.

Florida wildlife authorities want federal involvement in managing the state's growing panther population.

Florida Fish and Wildlife describes the Florida panther as a conservation success story as its population has rebounded to about 180 from fewer than 30 when it first was listed in 1967.