food deserts

The hunger relief non-profit Feeding Northeast Florida is partnering with the KIPP charter schools in Jacksonville to set up a permanent food pantry on its campus.

Second Harvest of the Big Bend distributed about 20 tons of food at Tallahassee's Godby High School on Saturday (May 19.)

A new city law puts money toward incentivizing grocery stores to open in Northwest Jacksonville, an area seen as a food desert.

As Bill Delaney with The Jaxson tells WJCT News Director Jessica Palombo, one store is already in the works at the southeast corner of Moncrief Road and Myrtle Avenue.

April was National Minority Health Month and with diabetes and other health related issues increasing in communities around the state, researchers want to address health disparities. The Florida Department of Health focused its efforts on food deserts and pushed for healthy eating and education. Researchers are pointing to those same food deserts as a contributor to health issues disproportionally affecting minorities, and advocates say education and access to healthier foods would help these communities get back to basics. 

With Northwest Jacksonville’s losing two grocery stores 10 miles apart, Feeding Northeast Florida is stepping in to help with what it considers a worsening food desert.

With two grocery stores set to close about 10 miles apart on Jacksonville’s Northwest side, some city officials are concerned residents won’t have enough access to healthy, fresh food.

WFSU news is taking a look at hunger in the Big Bend this week. In the final installment of our series we’ll take a look at the impact food deserts have on a person’s ability access fresh fruits and vegetables and the potential impact of new legislation lawmakers hope will help.

GEOGOZZ- Wikimedia Commons

As part of Michelle Obama's healthy eating initiative, a group of major food retailers promised in 2011 to open or expand 1,500 grocery or convenience stores in and around neighborhoods with no supermarkets by 2016. By their own count, they're far short.

TheFreshStopBus.com

The promise of a new year often comes with a familiar resolution: eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and get healthy.

But for the 23.5 million Americans living without easy access to a grocery store, eating healthy isn’t easy.

One Central Florida nonprofit this week started bringing a mobile farmer's market into neighborhoods that need it.