Florida

It’s been 27 years since the Americans With Disabilities Act was signed into law by President George H. W. Bush. The law has helped people with disabilities live their lives through physical accessibility, public services, and working against discrimination. ADA Advocates at the Gulf Coast Center for Independent Living say much has changed for the better, but more needs to be done.

With everyone age 65 and older eligible for Medicare, seniors may be the last group that comes to mind when there's talk of Medicaid spending reductions.

St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver addressed the U.S. Green Building Council Thursday in Jacksonville.


The deadline is approaching for Florida’s governor to sign off on a bill aimed at tracking the use of addictive prescription drugs. Some medical professionals see the measure as key to fighting the opioid epidemic.

This week on The Florida Roundup ...

After weeks of private negotiations, Senate Republicans unveiled their Better Care Reconciliation Act, their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. Florida has more at stake in this debate than any other state and South Florida alone has more than 600,000 people signed up for individual coverage through the ACA this year. 

Critics pounced after the Senate released its long-awaited bill to dismantle President Barack Obama's health care law on Thursday, saying its proposed cuts to Medicaid could be disastrous for the roughly 3.6 million Florida residents who rely on the program.

healthcare.gov

Six companies filed to sell health insurance in Florida next year on the Obamacare exchanges with an average rate increase of 17.8 percent, state officials said.

However, if the state approves the rate increase, it would likely be offset by an increase in federal subsidies. That means consumers wouldn’t have to pay much more for their premiums.

This week, hundreds of law enforcement flocked to the Florida Panhandle for the sixth annual Rural County summit. This year’s three-day event focused on terrorism prevention efforts.

It's June, it's hot, it's rainy -- and that means mosquitos are once again coming out in full force.

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about how the state and its residents are preparing for the potential threat of mosquito-borne illnesses like the Zika virus.


There's no doubt about it: Zika is on the retreat in the Americas.

In Brazil, cases are down by 95 percent from last year. Across the Caribbean, outbreaks have subsided. And in Florida, the virus seems to have gone into hiding. Health officials haven't investigated a new Zika case for more than 45 days in Miami-Dade County.

This Saturday is not only Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day, it’s also the kick off for Florida’s Lionfish Challenge—an incentive program to encourage people to remove the nonnative species. State wildlife officials are doing a bit of a revamp this year.

For the past year, WUSF has invited you to share the cost of your health care -- not your insurance premiums, but the cost of the care itself. Our PriceCheck project is a database made up of charges shared by health care facilities and costs contributed by you.

The Republican health care proposal passed by the U.S. House last week would cut $800 billion from Medicaid over the next decade.

As of Monday, more than 2,000 wildfires had burned throughout Florida since the start of this year, and state officials say more than a 120 wildfires continue to burn.

Tampa General Hospital

The state budget includes deep cuts to hospitals that serve the poor and lawmakers are betting on federal money to help offset the losses.

Poor Floridians may see less access to medical care. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, said the state is turning down billions of dollars in federal funding for health care this year because it is not expanding Medicaid. Florida lawmakers are also planning to cut Medicaid and hospital funding.

 

Development and sea level rise are two things Miami is known for. And they go hand-in-hand, as developers and local officials plan how to make buildings resilient against water that could rise three to six feet by 2100.

 

A drier-than-normal winter and spring have Northeast Florida water managers warning of an impending shortage.

But they say the worst can be staved off if people take it upon themselves to cut back their usage.


A march designed to defend the role science plays in "our health, safety, economies, and governments" is taking place Saturday—Earth Day—in Washington, D.C., and like related marches in recent months, the Science March is being supported by thousands of satellite marches across the nation, including several in South Florida.

Severe Drought Developing in Florida

Apr 2, 2017

It’s the heart of wildfire season in Florida, and more than 90 percent of the state is in a drought. The National Drought Mitigation Center classified the situation as “severe” in nine counties Thursday.

Florida Forest Service reports show that wildfires have scorched almost 60,000 acres since January 1st. State Climatologist David Zierden attributes the active fire season to the shortage of rain, which he says is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

The annual health ranking of Florida Counties is out, and while some Southwest Florida counties can claim bragging rights, others are looking at ways to improve.

Environmentalists say the latest peer-reviewed study by the group Science for Nature and People Partnership, underscores the need in Florida for a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Coaster420

Florida health officials who oversee the medical marijuana program have started processing identification card applications for patients and caregivers.

Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio met with Southwest Florida citrus growers Friday in Immokalee to discuss challenges facing the industry and how the federal government can help.  The bacterial disease, citrus greening, has decimated the industry over the past decade, reducing crop yields by 70 percent compared to where they stood twenty years ago. 

Republican Senator Dana Young of Tampa is making good on her campaign promise to file a statewide fracking ban.

Once Donald Trump was elected president, Republicans in Congress realized their chance to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act had finally arrived. The repeal process has already started. And while there is no replacement in sight for the foreseeable future the ACA’s healthcare exchange is still up and running and enrolling record numbers for health insurance in 2017. 

The latest study by non-profit organization Smart Growth America ranks Florida as the most dangerous state to walk in the country.

Florida is leading the country in signing up for federal health insurance coverage for 2017 according to federal figures. With still about a month left in the open enrollment period, the numbers are expected to grow even as the Republican-controlled Congress plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act as early as this week.

Expanded access to medical cannabis in Florida goes into effect on Tuesday, Jan. 3. The result of voters passing Amendment 2 in November, the new laws will significantly expand what medical conditions qualify for medical marijuana, but the rules to fully implement Amendment 2 are still months away.

When it comes to the welfare of Florida women, the Sunshine State gets a D+.

A new report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research found more women live in poverty and without access to health insurance than elsewhere in the nation. Florida also fell behind other states when it comes to a woman's access to education and economic opportunity.

Pages