electronic cigarettes

Wikimedia Commons- Lindsay Fox - EcigaretteReviewed.com

Electronic cigarettes have sickened rising numbers of young children, a study of U.S. poison center calls has found. Most cases involve swallowing liquid nicotine.

Associated Press

More teenagers are trying electronic cigarettes, known as e-cigarettes, according to a study by the University of Florida. Researchers found that teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely to use other tobacco products.

E-cigarettes produce vapor from a liquid that comes in a variety of flavors, like bubble gum and cotton candy. The liquid can be bought with or without nicotine.

Researchers say older people are turning to e-cigarettes to quit their smoking habit, while teens like them for recreational use.

Higher speed limits, medical marijuana, and child abuse are among the issues in the news today as the Legislature hits its end-of-session frenzy.

Here’s a look at the progress of several health-related bills:

Miami’s city commission voted unanimously Thursday to ban e-cigarette sales to minors.  The measure, which would also prohibit vending machine sales of e-cigarettes, would become law in Miami in 30 days if the commission backs it during a second reading, the Miami Herald reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports e-cigarette use among high school and middle school students more than doubled in 2012, from 3.3 to 6.8 percent.  

Luke Johnson / Tampa Tribune

Electronic cigarettes, which substitute water vapor for smoke, are growing in popularity, with new stores popping up all around. The Tampa Tribune reports that more than 20 percent of adult smokers across the country have tried “e-cigarettes,” which are not regulated by the FDA and contain varying amounts of nicotine and come in all kinds of flavors. Public health officials say they haven’t been adequately tested, but some former smokers swear by them.