e-cigarettes

Indoor Vaping Ban Moves Forward In CRC

Mar 21, 2018

A Constitution Revision Commission proposal to ban the vaping of e-cigarettes in all of Florida’s indoor businesses is one step closer to appearing on voter ballots. Former Florida Senator Lisa Carlton is the proposal’s sponsor. She says since the first e-cigarettes hit U.S. markets more than a decade ago, research and Surgeon General Reports have proven their adverse health effects.

A proposal to ban the smoking of electronic vaping devices is now heading to the full Constitution Revision Commission—the panel that meets every 20 years to change Florida’s constitution.

Florida’s smoking rate is at an all-time low, and state officials attribute the precipitous drop to aggressive anti-smoking campaigns. But some North Florida counties are struggling to keep pace with statewide success.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The nation seems to be kicking its smoking habit faster than ever before.

The rate of smoking among adults in the U.S. fell to 15 percent last year thanks to the biggest one-year decline in more than 20 years, according to a new government report.

Wikimedia Commons- Lindsay Fox - EcigaretteReviewed.com

Electronic cigarettes have sickened rising numbers of young children, a study of U.S. poison center calls has found. Most cases involve swallowing liquid nicotine.

House Bill Would Curb Regulation Of E-Cigarettes, Cigars

May 5, 2016
Ed Andrieski/Associated Press / Associated Press

Vape away.

Increasingly popular e-cigarettes and cigar varieties could be exempt from some government safety regulations if House Republicans have their way. It’s a move that alarms Democrats and public health advocates who argue that it could lead to unsafe products.

Study: E-Cigs, Hookah Popular Among Middle and High School Students

May 1, 2016

E-cigarettes and smoking hookah have gained popularity among middle and high school students in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The number of middle and high school students using e-cigarettes tripled from 2013 to 2014.

Senate Passes Bill Requiring Child-Proof Bottles Of Liquid Nicotine

Dec 14, 2015
WMFE

The U.S. Senate has passed legislation requiring child-proof liquid nicotine bottles. Calls to poison control centers involving children and liquid nicotine are on the rise.

Associated Press

More teenagers are trying electronic cigarettes, known as e-cigarettes, according to a study by the University of Florida. Researchers found that teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely to use other tobacco products.

E-cigarettes produce vapor from a liquid that comes in a variety of flavors, like bubble gum and cotton candy. The liquid can be bought with or without nicotine.

Researchers say older people are turning to e-cigarettes to quit their smoking habit, while teens like them for recreational use.

Add Attorney General Pam Bondi to the list of supporters challenging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s proposed rule linking e-cigarettes and cigars, the News Service of Florida reports. Her support, on behalf of Ybor City’s historic J.C. Newman Cigar Company, comes the same week dozens of other attorney generals asked that the rules regulating e-cigarettes be even stronger, according to the News Service.

The 2014 Florida Legislature passed a number of bills relating to health care, most of them modest in scope. 

But at least one that passed will probably save lives: the Child Welfare Act, which in part responds to the deaths of 477 children who were supposed to be under the protection of the Department of Children and Families.

The DCF overhaul had already begun before the session, but was intensified after the Miami Herald published the series Innocents Lost.

Higher speed limits, medical marijuana, and child abuse are among the issues in the news today as the Legislature hits its end-of-session frenzy.

Here’s a look at the progress of several health-related bills:

Lawmakers Poised to Ban E-Cig Sales to Kids

Apr 2, 2014
Alicia Mandigo

A bill that would ban sales to minors recently passed the Florida Senate unanimously, and a similar bill is pending in the House.  

What started out as an online, underground fad is now a billion dollar business. Electronic cigarettes,  often called e-cigarettes, really aren't cigarettes at all because there's no tobacco, no flame and no smoke. But there are still a lot of questions about where they can be used and whether they pose a health risk. 

A bill to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors gained legislative support this week, according to the Miami Herald.

Reps. Frank Artiles, R-Miami, and Doc Renuart, R-Ponte Vedra Beach, sponsored the House version, which won approval from its first committee. The Senate version, (SB224), passed through two committees, including Appropriations.

Several cities also have made it illegal to sell e-cigarettes to minors, the Herald reports. 

Miami’s city commission voted unanimously Thursday to ban e-cigarette sales to minors.  The measure, which would also prohibit vending machine sales of e-cigarettes, would become law in Miami in 30 days if the commission backs it during a second reading, the Miami Herald reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports e-cigarette use among high school and middle school students more than doubled in 2012, from 3.3 to 6.8 percent.  

Electronic cigarettes are sparking lots of skepticism from public health types worried they may be a gateway to regular smoking.

But the cigarettes, which use water vapor to deliver nicotine into the lungs, may be as good as the patch when it comes to stop-smoking aids, a study finds.

Smokers who used e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit the old-fashioned kind of cigarettes did about as well at stopping smoking as the people who tried the patch.

After six months, 7.3 percent of e-smokers had dropped cigarettes, compared to 5.8 percent of people wearing the patch.

Until he discovered e-cigarettes at a flea market, John Sweet had a two-pack-a-day habit.  After trying the $50 product, he decided to quit smoking because of the lower cost and perceived health benefits of e-cigarettes compared to tobacco. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that the nicotine alternative has its own risks, according to the Ocala Star Banner.

Luke Johnson / Tampa Tribune

Electronic cigarettes, which substitute water vapor for smoke, are growing in popularity, with new stores popping up all around. The Tampa Tribune reports that more than 20 percent of adult smokers across the country have tried “e-cigarettes,” which are not regulated by the FDA and contain varying amounts of nicotine and come in all kinds of flavors. Public health officials say they haven’t been adequately tested, but some former smokers swear by them.