Being a medical student or resident is hard enough, but what if you have a disability that adds to the challenge?

Uber is driving deeper into health care by offering to take patients in every U.S. market where it operates to their next medical appointment.

Many of us make New Year's resolutions. Few of us realize them. Maybe it would help to reframe how we handle our resolutions by thinking of them as goals instead.

What health goals will you reach for in 2018? And which, if any, will you discuss with your doctor?

In April 2014, state and federal drug agents raided Jeffrey Campbell’s medical clinic in Jeffersonville, Indiana. Police cars blocked the parking lot as bewildered patients scattered and the agents carted off boxes of records from the doctor’s office.

Florida doctors are rarely punished by state regulators even after they are sued for malpractice according to a newspaper report.

Pierre de Champs / Flickr

After Hurricane Harvey flooded her city of Houston in August, Dr. Jennifer McQuade planned to donate socks to those affected. Instead, surprised by the lack of medical care at a nearby shelter, McQuade, an oncologist, became the unofficial leader of a group of physicians and mothers providing emergency aid at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. She triaged patients, solicited donations and recruited more doctors to join.

The governor and state lawmakers are proposing new prescription limits to fight opioid abuse.  But they also want to require physicians use a long-standing drug monitoring database—raising the question, why wasn’t it mandatory to begin with?

Training New Doctors Right Where They Are Needed

Oct 10, 2017

Dr. Olga Meave didn’t mind the dry, 105-degree heat that scorched this Central Valley city on a recent afternoon.

As Dr. Ruth Berggren digests the calamity affecting her new home state of Texas, she admits to some PTSD.

In 2005, she was an infectious-disease doctor at Charity Hospital in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit, and she became one of a small number of physicians left to care for 250 patients for six days, trapped by flooding and without running water or electricity.

The number of doctors who each prescribe millions of dollars of medications annually in Medicare's drug program has soared, driven by expensive hepatitis C treatments and rising drug prices overall, federal data obtained by ProPublica show.

The number of providers who topped the $5 million mark for prescriptions increased more than tenfold, from 41 in 2011 to 514 in 2015. The number of prescribers — mostly physicians but also nurse practitioners — exceeding $10 million in drug costs jumped from two to 70 over the same time period, according to the data.

Doctors accused of sexual abuse are allowed to continue practicing medicine in Florida, the Palm Beach Post reports.

Some are even allowed to keep their licenses after they admit to sexual misconduct on a patient, according to an investigation by the newspaper.

At Edgewood Summit retirement community in Charleston, W.Va., 93-year-old Mary Mullens is waxing eloquent about her geriatrician, Dr. Todd Goldberg.

"He's sure got a lot to do," she says, "and does it so well."

West Virginia has the third oldest population in the nation, right behind Maine and Florida. But Goldberg is one of only 36 geriatricians in the state.

Patients suffered no additional harm when doctors training to be surgeons were allowed to work longer shifts, a study published Tuesday concludes. The findings provide fresh evidence for medical educators looking to relax the strictest limits on resident hours.

FL Whistleblower Wary Of Hospitals Hiring Docs

Oct 7, 2015
Photo by Rytyho usa via Wikimedia Commons

There is a good chance that your once-independent doctor is now employed by a hospital. Dr. Michael Reilly, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., orthopedic surgeon, does not believe this is good for physicians, patients or society.

For years he watched Broward Health, a nonprofit Florida hospital system, hire community doctors, pay them millions and minutely track the revenue they generated from admissions, procedures and tests.

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Behind the scenes at the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, two top physicians feuded so badly over just about everything that a "personality coach" was hired to try to soothe tensions. 

But as the Miami Herald reports, the two stars couldn’t coexist; and after one of the doctors left Bascom Palmer, he turned in the other over allegations of Medicare fraud.

Nearly 1 million Floridians have signed up for coverage via the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but some in South Florida are having to battle with doctors for treatment, the Miami Herald reports.

FL Docs Make Pricey Medicare Claims

May 16, 2014

When Medicare patients come in for an office visit, the doctor bills for that interaction on a scale of one to five.

A one is a relatively quick, simple office visit. A five is more complex and lengthy.

Oh, and that level five visit also pays more.

Three of the top five Medicare payments in 2012 went to doctors who practice in Florida, according to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The Florida doctors topping the list are Salomon E. Melgen of West Palm Beach (#1), Asad U. Qamar of Ocala (#2) and Alexander M. Eaton of Fort Myers (#5).

Florida’s 61,000 medical doctors will get a 31-percent cut on their license renewal fee under a proposal adopted by the Florida Board of Medicine.

The renewal fee for MDs who have active licenses will be reduced from the usual $360 to $250 during the calendar years 2015-16, under the proposal. MDs have to renew their license every other year.

This one-time fee cut was adopted by the board's finance committee in March and by the fullboard last Friday. It still has to go through the rule-making process, which takes several months. No serious opposition is expected.

A doctor accused of sexually abusing four women patients at clinics in Melbourne and Daytona Beach should lose his license, the Florida Board of Medicine said Friday.

The board threw out a settlement that would have allowed Dr. Albert Esmailzadeh to keep practicing as long as he didn’t treat women patients. That emergency restriction was imposed in March.

But board members said he shouldn’t be seeing any patients, male or female.

“This is a bad actor, a real bad actor,” said board chairman Dr. Zachariah P. Zachariah.   

Doctors in Trouble Keep Practicing

Oct 21, 2013

Medical professionals in Florida hang onto their licenses and continue practicing as the state grapples with a lengthy disciplinary process that can take years, according to an analysis by the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting.

Between 2010 and 2012, it took the Florida Board of Medicine an average 434 days to resolve charges of misconduct against doctors, nurses and other health care workers, according to Florida Department of Health records.

A federal judge in Tallahassee has thrown out a medical-malpractice defense law passed this year that gave a  defense attorney the right to question the plaintiff's other doctors without permission, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

PolitiFact checks out two different claims on the Affordable Care Act:

Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office

A Delray Beach doctor who signed a lease saying he wouldn’t be opening a pain clinic appears to be running a pain clinic anyway, the Palm Beach Post reports. Dr. Fernando Jimenez has been arrested after nearby businesses tipped off authorities that patients were looking for him to write prescriptions for powerful pain pills. 

Will Vragoic / Tampa Bay Times

The gigantic retirement community known as The Villages -- with almost 100,000 residents who like getting around in golf carts -- has teamed up with the University of South Florida to create medical homes with an old-time friendly style of primary care, the Tampa Bay Times reports

Attorneys for doctors’ groups told appellate judges in Miami on Thursday that a Florida law barring them from asking about patients’ gun ownership abridges their First Amendment right to free speech, according to NBC 6 South Florida. But the state solicitor general argued the law defends patients’ right to bear arms, as outlined in the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The three-judge panel asked questions but will delay a decision.

Uncle Sam wants your doctor to go digital. And the federal government is backing that up with money for practices that start using computerized systems for record keeping.

Nearly half of all physicians in America still rely on paper records for most patient care. Time is running out for those who do to take advantage of federal funds to make the switch. So practices like Colorado Springs Internal Medicine are scrambling to get with the program.

The PSA test has been dissed a lot lately. The nation's preventive medicine task force, for one, says the test is so unreliable in figuring out who's at risk for deadly prostate cancer that most men shouldn't bother getting one.

Christopher George told a jury that he made close to $40 million running pill mills in South Florida with his twin brother, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports. He said they took in so much cash they had to store it in garbage cans, the Palm Beach Post reports.

Bill Branson / National Cancer Institute

A shortage of primary care doctors exists across much of Florida, not just in small, rural counties, the Associated Press reports. According to federal data, communities in Miami, Tampa and Orlando don’t have enough primary care physicians, either.