dialysis

Amy Prieur/WMFE

Blayne Badura thought that he had this kidney disease thing figured out. For two decades, he had worked as a Seminole County Deputy, a job that he loved and allowed him to provide for his wife and two children, while doing dialysis three times a week.

When Hurricane Irma slammed into the U.S. Virgin Islands, Alvin Joseph was home in St. Thomas with his wife, his oldest granddaughter and four of his great-grandkids.

As the wind howled, Joseph and his wife went into the little boys’ bedroom to get a mattress and box spring for protection.

“The ceiling tiles had already disappeared out of the roof and we could see the sky,” says Joseph. “By the time we left out of the bedroom to go back in the living room—whoosh—roof was gone.”

Among the most pressing medical needs facing Houston at the moment: getting people to dialysis treatment.

At DaVita Med Center Dialysis on Tuesday afternoon, nurses tended to dozens of patients on dialysis machines while another 100 people waited their turn. Some were clearly uncomfortable, and a number said they hadn't been dialyzed in four days.

Those delays can be life-threatening.

About half a million Americans need dialysis, which cleans toxins from the body when the kidneys can't anymore. It can cost more than $50,000 a year, and takes hours each week at a dialysis center.

Doctors are issuing a warning about extreme cross training: overdoing it may have a dangerous effect on your kidneys, WPTV reports. According to Palm Beach Gardens nephrologist Dr.

In a column in the Miami Herald, former Miami Heat star Alonzo Mourning, who received a kidney transplant in 2003, laments a proposal to cut Medicare payments for kidney dialysis, the live-saving treatment for those who suffer kidney disease but don’t have access to a transplant. In Florida alone, Mourning writes, about 25,000 people rely on dialysis.