contraceptives

Senate Bill Would Boost Contraceptive Coverage

Jan 7, 2018

Health-insurance policies would be required to provide coverage for FDA-approved contraceptive drugs without imposing deductibles, coinsurance or co-payment requirements under a bill filed Friday by state Sen. Lauren Book, D-Plantation.

Supreme Court Takes Up Birth Control Access — Again

Mar 24, 2016
Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press / Associated Press Photo

On the sixth anniversary of the enactment of the federal Affordable Care Act, the law was back before a seemingly divided Supreme Court Wednesday.

Pregnant women worry about all kinds of things. Can I drink alcohol? (No.) Can I take antidepressants? (Maybe.) Can I do the downward dog? (Yes.)

Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court is wading into its fourth dispute over President Barack Obama's 5-year-old health care overhaul.

Long-Acting Contraceptives Still Often Not Free For Women

Oct 13, 2014

New research suggests that teenagers are more likely to choose long-acting contraceptives when cost is removed from the equation. And free coverage of such methods is required by the health law. But now, a study has found that free coverage of such methods too often still falls short.

The study, published in the journal Contraception by the Guttmacher Institute, found that insurance coverage of contraceptives without cost sharing has improved markedly since the health law’s requirement became effective for most women in 2013.

Tom Beckwith, a Largo small-business owner, welcomed the news that he would not have to pay for his employees’ access to certain products that he thinks cause abortions. But Arlene Davidson, state policy director for a Jewish women’s group, viewed the news as a major defeat for women.  

The Obama administration is moving to end a long-running controversy over making no-cost birth control available under the federal health law.

One of the more popular provisions of the federal health law requires that women be given much freer access to prescription methods of birth control. That includes not only the pill, but implants and IUDs as well.

But what happens if there are not enough doctors to prescribe those contraceptives?

That's exactly what worries some reproductive health advocates, as efforts are underway to rewrite rules governing the training of the nation's family doctors.