athletes

Anek Suwannaphoom / Flickr

What kind of heart check-up do young athletes need to make the team? A large study of teenage soccer players in England found in-depth screening didn't detect signs of trouble in some athletes who later died — yet allowed others at risk to get treated and back in the game.

Depending on whom you ask, finding out whether your genes make you a better athlete or give you healthier skin may be as easy as swabbing your cheeks for a DNA test on your way into a football game. But others say these "wellness" tests marketed directly to consumers are modern snake oil — worthless, or even misleading.

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration gave a boost to direct-to-consumer genetic testing when it announced plans to streamline its approval process.

If you're involved in high school athletics, you know the scene. There's increasing pressure to specialize in a single sport and play it year-round.

Who's going to be more successful at selling health insurance to young men this fall: NBA MVP LeBron James, NFL rookie of the year Robert Griffin III, or Mom? If officials at the Department of Health and Human Services get their way, all may be drafted.

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

While most of the buzz around concussions has been concentrated on football, girls who play sports are reporting concussions at twice of the rate of boys, experts say. Coaches of high school girls’ teams are taking concussions more seriously, the Orlando Sentinel reports.  

 

No state income tax. Warm weather. Lots of fitness trainers. And cash-only medical clinics with no state regulation.