Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Tobacco Free Florida is partnering with a state workforce board to help unemployed Floridians who smoke have a better chance at employment.

The head of Florida’s child welfare agency is defending a human trafficking tool used by his agency and some others. His remarks follow a report released months ago that questions the tool’s effectiveness.

It’s Disability Employment Awareness Month, and a Bay County business is one of ten recognized across the state for hiring people with disabilities.

A measure signed into law by President Obama includes money to help combat the Zika virus. Florida is expected to be one of the areas to get a large amount of the funds. That’s in addition to the millions of dollars in state money Governor Rick Scott has already set aside in the Zika fight. But, questions now remain about when and how the funds will be distributed to help affected Floridians.

The U.S. Senate has again blocked a bill that would have provided funds to help combat the Zika virus.

The U.S. Senate announced Thursday that a bipartisan Zika funding deal has been struck and a vote could take place next week. But, in the meantime, Governor Rick Scott has authorized $25 million to go toward researching a vaccine to combat the Zika virus.

Governor Rick Scott has declared the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami "Zika free," and the federal Centers for Disease Control has lifted its Travel Advisory for that area.

It’s good news to Florida’s Congressional Delegation and Governor Rick Scott that Congress could be close to striking a deal on funding efforts to combat the Zika virus. Florida just passed the 800 mark for the amount of cases reported to health officials. But, Florida leaders are a bit split on how that funding should be accomplished.

Could Congress be close to passing a Zika funding bill? A bipartisan group of Florida’s Congressional Delegation is calling that welcome news.

Congress is facing a September 30th deadline to make sure a budget deal is reached to fund the federal government. Lawmakers just came back from a seven-week break, and both the U.S. House and Senate have yet to reach an agreement on a bill to fund anti-Zika efforts—widely seen as a non-partisan issue. Governor Rick Scott is going Tuesday for a two-day trip to Washington D.C. to talk to members of Congress of the importance of that funding for Florida.

After about two months in recess, Congress is back in Washington D.C., and people are hopeful there will be some agreement on what can be done to combat the Zika virus—which has already plagued more than 750 Floridians. That comes as the Senate failed to pass another Zika funding bill again this week and there may be even more issues surrounding the mosquito-borne disease on the table.

Governor Rick Scott says he’s disappointed by the failure of Congress to pass a Zika funding bill, and he’s not alone.

With more and more locally transmitted Zika cases in Florida, a bipartisan group of state House lawmakers are joining together to ask for federal help to combat the mosquito-borne disease.

Final recommendations on a memorial for the unclaimed remains uncovered on the Dozier School for Boy grounds are now heading to the Florida Legislature. But, during the final meeting of the panel tasked with making those suggestions, tensions were pretty high.

Will Florida Moms adopt the “Baby Box?” The committee that reviews child abuse death cases is hoping that could be a successful effort to help Florida in the future, and got an update on that Wednesday.

Most Florida schools have already started, and state officials are continuing to prepare school superintendents as well as school personnel on what they can do to inform parents and protect the students from the Zika virus.

With school starting, Florida Agriculture officials are hoping parents and students will have an easier way to find out about school meals ahead of time. Officials are encouraging them to download the meal apps—specific to their school district.

South Georgia health officials want to make sure residents are taking the proper precautions to help prevent the Zika virus from coming to the area.

August is Child Safety Awareness Month, and the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles along with several other state agencies are partnering with law enforcement groups to recognize the importance of the month.

Florida wildlife officials are asking the public for their help in deciding rules for venomous reptiles.

On Wednesday, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) chaired a congressional hearing on the Zika Virus—which the head of the Centers for Disease Control is now calling a “silent epidemic.” This comes as Congress still has not taken action on a bill to fund Zika prevention efforts and will recess soon.

Leon County Health officials are encouraging parents to book appointments early for back-to-school vaccines.

A new report states a human trafficking tool used among some state agencies may not be that effective.

Florida health officials have unveiled a new campaign aimed at teaching kids about mosquitoes and the diseases they can carry, like the Zika virus.

With the 2016 Summer Olympics right around the corner, some state officials are worried that will cause an increase in travel-related cases in Florida. And, with Congress still not acting on any Zika funding bills, it’s causing even more worry as officials continue to monitor the impact the mosquito-borne disease has during these Summer months.

Gun control supporters aren’t too happy with how the week turned out. While some expressed their outrage over the U.S. Senate’s rejection of several bills, others have held demonstrations in response to the House’s lack of votes. But, they’re still holding out hope that something can be done on the federal level to help curb gun violence.

The relatives of two people killed by firearms say they’re disappointed gun control legislation they supported failed to get enough votes in the Republican-led U.S. Senate.

National HIV Testing Day is Monday. But, ahead of that day, Bay County health officials are offering free HIV testing in several Panhandle counties.

One of the many focuses of this year’s upcoming Human Trafficking Summit may be on Florida’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT community.

In the wake of the mass shooting in Orlando, a U.S. Senator from Florida has filed a measure that he believes the National Rifle Association could get behind.

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