Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Following last year’s mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub and this year’s at the Fort Lauderdale airport, some Republican lawmakers are showing even more support for open carry-related bills. But, a gun coalition as well as some Democratic lawmakers are countering those pro-gun bills with measures of their own.

A group of researchers has just completed a local community-based study on how the racial disparity can affect a person’s health. Researchers compared how racial discrimination among Tallahassee’s African Americans can increase the risk for high blood pressure.

A Florida lawmaker is hoping a claims bill to further compensate a child abuse victim will pass the state legislature for 2017. This will be the fourth year the measure comes before lawmakers.

The newest chairman of the committee that looks at children and elder affair issues is outlining some of his top priorities for the 2017 legislative session.

A state lawmaker has refiled his bill relating to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law.

Over the summer, the Pulse Nightclub tragedy garnered national attention as the worst mass shooting in modern American history. And, while it’s certainly influenced the lives affected by the massacre, the incident is also influencing legislative issues for the 2017 session.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement wants to revise a law further cracking down on sex offenders that was slated to take effect a couple months ago.

There are now more than 1,200 cases of the Zika virus in Florida, and about a fifth are locally contracted cases via Florida mosquitoes. So, health officials are reminding Floridians to continue taking preventive measures to combat the disease.

Florida prison officials say they’re looking to enhance the mental health treatment of inmates—particularly in the Panhandle. But, they need to hire more than 100 employees to meet that goal. Kim Banks is the Chief Financial Officer for the Florida Department of Corrections.

The Vice President of Florida Sheriffs Association is weighing in on the passage of Amendment 2—allowing for the expansion of medical marijuana in Florida.

Unsafe sleep is the number one cause of child deaths in Florida. That’s prompted an ongoing state campaign to prevent such deaths. And, one organization has more tips for parents and caregivers about their child’s sleeping conditions.

The Walton County Sheriff’s office is participating in “No Shave November.” It’s a way for men to stop shaving for a month to raise awareness about cancer and cancer hair loss.

Florida Department of Corrections’ probation officers will be working with law enforcement across the state Monday to ensure sex offenders are not interacting with kids this Halloween.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is partnering with other health officials to remind parents to avoid “candy confusion” by keep their medications and their children’s Halloween candy separate.

A Florida State University program is one of several recognized for its continued advancement of independence for blind and visually impaired Floridians.

October is National Blindness Awareness Month. But, Florida officials are also recognizing the 75th anniversary of the Florida Division of Blind Services year round. During a recent ceremony celebrating blind and visually impaired Floridians, the organization also marked the importance of the state’s White Cane Law.

Tobacco Free Florida is partnering with a state workforce board to help unemployed Floridians who smoke have a better chance at employment.

The head of Florida’s child welfare agency is defending a human trafficking tool used by his agency and some others. His remarks follow a report released months ago that questions the tool’s effectiveness.

It’s Disability Employment Awareness Month, and a Bay County business is one of ten recognized across the state for hiring people with disabilities.

A measure signed into law by President Obama includes money to help combat the Zika virus. Florida is expected to be one of the areas to get a large amount of the funds. That’s in addition to the millions of dollars in state money Governor Rick Scott has already set aside in the Zika fight. But, questions now remain about when and how the funds will be distributed to help affected Floridians.

The U.S. Senate has again blocked a bill that would have provided funds to help combat the Zika virus.

The U.S. Senate announced Thursday that a bipartisan Zika funding deal has been struck and a vote could take place next week. But, in the meantime, Governor Rick Scott has authorized $25 million to go toward researching a vaccine to combat the Zika virus.

Governor Rick Scott has declared the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami "Zika free," and the federal Centers for Disease Control has lifted its Travel Advisory for that area.

It’s good news to Florida’s Congressional Delegation and Governor Rick Scott that Congress could be close to striking a deal on funding efforts to combat the Zika virus. Florida just passed the 800 mark for the amount of cases reported to health officials. But, Florida leaders are a bit split on how that funding should be accomplished.

Could Congress be close to passing a Zika funding bill? A bipartisan group of Florida’s Congressional Delegation is calling that welcome news.

Congress is facing a September 30th deadline to make sure a budget deal is reached to fund the federal government. Lawmakers just came back from a seven-week break, and both the U.S. House and Senate have yet to reach an agreement on a bill to fund anti-Zika efforts—widely seen as a non-partisan issue. Governor Rick Scott is going Tuesday for a two-day trip to Washington D.C. to talk to members of Congress of the importance of that funding for Florida.

After about two months in recess, Congress is back in Washington D.C., and people are hopeful there will be some agreement on what can be done to combat the Zika virus—which has already plagued more than 750 Floridians. That comes as the Senate failed to pass another Zika funding bill again this week and there may be even more issues surrounding the mosquito-borne disease on the table.

Governor Rick Scott says he’s disappointed by the failure of Congress to pass a Zika funding bill, and he’s not alone.

With more and more locally transmitted Zika cases in Florida, a bipartisan group of state House lawmakers are joining together to ask for federal help to combat the mosquito-borne disease.

Final recommendations on a memorial for the unclaimed remains uncovered on the Dozier School for Boy grounds are now heading to the Florida Legislature. But, during the final meeting of the panel tasked with making those suggestions, tensions were pretty high.

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