Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

An organization that deals a lot with human trafficked kids says it’s important to go into the schools and educate potential victims early about traffickers.

In response to a spate of child abuse deaths in Florida, state lawmakers in 2014 created teams to investigate the root causes of these deaths and report them to Florida’s child welfare agency. Now, a similar effort is underway for the state’s elderly population.

Florida lawmakers are trying to establish a pilot program to help newborns exposed to addictive drugs while in their mother’s womb.

Bills aimed at making it easier for human trafficking victims to sue their traffickers have passed a House committee.

A revived bill that wades into the abortion debate has passed its first Florida Senate Committee, but not without opposition.

A bill seeking to make it easier for firearm dealers to pay for the criminal background checks has unanimously passed its first Senate committee.

A bill giving a tax exemption on diapers and feminine hygiene products has cleared its first Florida Senate committee.

With the 2018 legislative session around the corner, Florida lawmakers as well as child welfare stakeholders are starting to dive into how to address the huge turnover of the state’s child protective investigators. Their job is to look into cases called into the state’s child abuse hotline.

Bills aimed at fixing a glitch in a Florida law have cleared their first legislative committees in the House and Senate. The two measures could get more pro bono attorneys to help kids with special needs.

The “Up and Away” campaign is underway for the Halloween Season. Health officials are warning parents to keep medicines away from their kids to avoid confusing pills with candy.

Amid an ongoing lawsuit, the Florida Department of Corrections is now asking the legislature for more than $19 million in funding to treat inmates with the Hepatitis C virus.

This month, the Florida Department of Health is placing emphasis on the importance of getting screened for breast cancer.

The Florida Cabinet commemorated Disability Employment Awareness Month at its Tuesday meeting.

October is the Domestic Violence Awareness Month. This month, the Florida Department of Children and Families also received a grant to help support domestic violence victims.

A bill aimed at teaching Florida students about the dangers of human trafficking passed its first Senate panel Monday.

As Florida continues to work to combat human trafficking, some experts say working to make sure everyone recognizes the signs is important. But, equally important is going after the so-called “johns” themselves.

A new Florida law requiring autism awareness training for law enforcement officers takes effect Sunday.

Governor Rick Scott does not appear to be backing down from his emergency rule, requiring nursing homes and assisted living facilities to have a generator within the next two months.

The Gulf County bay scallop season is now open to harvesters, after state wildlife officials postponed the season for about two months.

Florida’s child welfare officials are doing a review of their system and already looking ahead legislatively on the state and national level on what can be done to further help children within the system.

Two Florida lawmakers are hoping to get more pro-bono attorneys to help kids with special needs for the 2018 legislative session.

Three former Florida correctional officers linked to the Ku Klux Klan have been convicted of first degree murder for planning to murder a black inmate in North Central Florida.

Governor Rick Scott is weighing in on last week’s death of a young boy left in a hot day care van for almost half a day, and possible changes to Florida law.

Florida wildlife officials are highlighting sandhill cranes as well as better ways for the public to coexist with the threatened bird species.

Florida’s U.S. Senators, Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson, joined 18 other Congressional colleagues in filing bipartisan legislation crack down on websites, which knowingly facilitate online sex trafficking. They’re targeting one website in particular.

While the public is normally urged to “thank a Veteran” they meet, the head of Florida’s Department of Veterans' Affairs also wants people to ask a state vet about their earned federal and state health benefits.

Okaloosa County Health Department received a national award for best practices in working to prevent HIV infections.

Tuesday marks the start of World Breastfeeding Week, and a number of Panhandle county health departments are marking the week with several events.

Thanks to the work of Tallahassee’s Fire Department and local unions, the city’s firefighters have secured federal funds to help local fire stations install a much-need air filter system on their trucks.

Florida’s Guardian ad Litem program may have thousands of volunteers, but agency officials say they need more male role models, who can advocate on behalf of the state’s abused and neglected children.

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