Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Florida’s child welfare officials are doing a review of their system and already looking ahead legislatively on the state and national level on what can be done to further help children within the system.

Two Florida lawmakers are hoping to get more pro-bono attorneys to help kids with special needs for the 2018 legislative session.

Three former Florida correctional officers linked to the Ku Klux Klan have been convicted of first degree murder for planning to murder a black inmate in North Central Florida.

Governor Rick Scott is weighing in on last week’s death of a young boy left in a hot day care van for almost half a day, and possible changes to Florida law.

Florida wildlife officials are highlighting sandhill cranes as well as better ways for the public to coexist with the threatened bird species.

Florida’s U.S. Senators, Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson, joined 18 other Congressional colleagues in filing bipartisan legislation crack down on websites, which knowingly facilitate online sex trafficking. They’re targeting one website in particular.

While the public is normally urged to “thank a Veteran” they meet, the head of Florida’s Department of Veterans' Affairs also wants people to ask a state vet about their earned federal and state health benefits.

Okaloosa County Health Department received a national award for best practices in working to prevent HIV infections.

Tuesday marks the start of World Breastfeeding Week, and a number of Panhandle county health departments are marking the week with several events.

Thanks to the work of Tallahassee’s Fire Department and local unions, the city’s firefighters have secured federal funds to help local fire stations install a much-need air filter system on their trucks.

Florida’s Guardian ad Litem program may have thousands of volunteers, but agency officials say they need more male role models, who can advocate on behalf of the state’s abused and neglected children.

A new report on how Florida handles young human trafficking victims is receiving mixed reviews.

Florida wildlife officials say lionfish harvesters are crucial to getting rid of the invasive species. But, lionfish removal divers are urged to safely remove the fish without causing any natural habitat damage.

Florida’s Guardian ad Litem Program has received a $40,000 grant to help older youth aging out of foster care better transition into adulthood.

A new Florida task force met for the first time this week to start looking into transportation issues people with developmental and intellectual disabilities face on a daily basis. The Task Force on Transportation Disadvantaged Services was created as part of a new law that just took effect.

As both sides of the Stand Your Ground issue weigh in, what impact could a Florida judge calling legislative changes to the state’s Stand Your Ground law unconstitutional have statewide?

The Florida lawmaker who authored this year’s changes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law says the legislature does have the right to update the law. It’s in response to a judge’s ruling Monday declaring the revised version unconstitutional.

A new law takes effect Saturday that would allow a state law enforcement agency to better conduct investigations into the treatment of Florida prison inmates.

Advocates are happy about a new law on the books slated to take effect Saturday to help protect kids within Florida’s child welfare system.

Despite a harmful algal bloom in 2015, Florida wildlife officials say the bay scallop population in Saint Joe Bay appears to be improving.

The “Cameron Mayhew Act” is slated to take effect Saturday, after Governor Rick Scott signed the bill into law aimed at increasing school bus safety.

Florida State University is touting its medical school program as well as its diversity.

Governor Rick Scott has signed a bill into law that supporters say will help in the fight against Parkinson’s disease.

Gun rights supporters as well as gun control advocates are declaring victory over this year’s Florida legislative session. But, they’re marking some disappointments as well.

This week, hundreds of law enforcement flocked to the Florida Panhandle for the sixth annual Rural County summit. This year’s three-day event focused on terrorism prevention efforts.

Florida’s teen birth rates are on a steady decline, according to a national report.

A gun rights group is declaring victory, after Governor Rick Scott signed a Stand Your Ground-related bill into law last week.

Governor Rick Scott recently signed a bill into law requiring autism awareness training for Florida’s law enforcement officers. But, some may not see the merits of the new law—that gained traction after a high profile incident last year.

A Florida lawmaker is hoping the state legislature will take up a refiled gun control bill during this week’s special session.

Funding for a first-of-its-kind facility did not survive the Governor’s veto pen. That’s despite being named for an abused victim of the now-closed Dozier School for Boys.

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