Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

On the heels of a toxic algae bloom spreading across South Florida, Bay County health officials are reminding residents and visitors to be careful in area waters through a health campaign.

The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s office wants area residents to “Think Before They Dive.” It’s part of an initiative to promote safety on local waterways.

Florida’s wildlife agency will be holding a lionfish summit in the Fall. The goal is to find more ways to get rid of the spiny invasive species plaguing state waters.

From “smart traps” to underwater drones, Florida’s wildlife agency hopes five organizations will spend thousands of dollars in grant funding to find new ways to further target lionfish. The spiny invasive species eat fish native to Florida, have no natural predators, and can lay thousands of eggs over a short period of time.

June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month, and state officials want Florida’s seniors to be aware of common scams to avoid.

One of Attorney General Pam Bondi’s top priorities is cracking down on drugs. And, during a recent Florida Cabinet meeting, she invited a young rapper to spread a similar anti-drug message.

It’s now been two years after the Pulse nightclub mass shooting that left 49 people dead in Orlando. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) says it’s time Congress acts on bipartisan gun reform legislation.

May is Lupus Awareness Month. Allison Wiman is the Executive Director of Big Bend Area Health Education Center and the Big Bend Rural Health Network, which serves several counties in the Florida Panhandle. She spoke with Sascha Cordner about how her group is working toward a statewide initiative to get more data on Lupus and bring more awareness to the hard-to-diagnose disease.

The Lionfish Challenge is underway, and it’s one of several efforts to rid Florida of the invasive species that has no natural predators and negatively impacts wildlife.

As we head into the Summer months, health officials say protecting yourself from the sun’s intense rays with protective sunscreen, clothing, and eyewear is key. The goal is ensure Floridians do not get skin cancer and if they do, detect it early.

Two months after it passed the state legislature, Florida’s latest gun reform law is still under scrutiny from gun control and pro-gun advocates alike.

With more children out of school during the Summer months, there also tends to be an uptick in kids left in hot cars. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the temperature inside of a car can rise almost 20 degrees. And, Leon County Health Department spokesman Chris Tittel says that’s just within the first 10 minutes with a window cracked open.

This year’s “Operation Spring Cleaning” was a huge success. More than half the counties in the state participated in an effort to get controlled substances off the street during a six-month period.

It’s Nesting season for Florida’s waterbirds. And, Florida wildlife officials say it’s important the public keeps its distance, while on the beach or boating on the state’s waterways.

The need for gun reform is top of mind for the four Democratic candidates running for Governor. They discussed that during their first televised debate.

More than 30 wildfires are burning across Florida, and at least three of them are still significant—burning thousands of acres.

Florida could soon be filing its own opioid abuse lawsuit against drug manufacturers. They’d be joining a long list of states, counties, and cities that have done the same.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month ends Saturday. And, Florida health officials want the public to be aware of the cancer that’s the second leading cause of death among men and women.

Florida health officials are warning about the dangers of sharing contact lenses.

In a YouTube video, the Florida Department of Health warns against sharing contact lenses, especially cosmetic ones. It starts off with one girl with brown eyes asking a friend to borrow her blue lenses, before they go out.

Within one week, Governor Rick Scott not only signed a gun safety bill into law, he also approved the budget, which includes millions of dollars for school safety purposes. Still, that didn’t prevent the National Rifle Association from filing a federal lawsuit against a provision in the new safety law. And, on the one month mark of the Parkland mass school shooting, thousands of kids across the nation walked out of their schools. Some Parkland families also asked officials to put ideas on the ballot to ban assault rifles and have universal background checks, and lawmakers in Washington D.C. may be moving forward on gun safety bills of their own.

After passing the Florida legislature last week, Governor Rick Scott decided to sign the gun safety legislation into law. Earlier in the week, he told reporters he’d wait before signing it, until he talked to the families who were impacted by the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school.

The Florida Legislature has agreed to allow certain Florida officials to visit the state’s juvenile justice facilities. It’s now heading to the Governor’s desk.

On a 67-50 vote, the Florida House passed the gun safety bill, already approved by the Florida Senate earlier in the week. Governor Rick Scott won’t say whether he will sign the bill, now heading to his desk. He says he’ll weigh input from those who lost loved ones in last month's mass shooting at a South Florida high school.

While a lot of eyes are on Tallahassee to see what the state Legislature has in store in terms of gun reforms, Florida’s U.S. Senators are also talking about what they’d like to see Congress do as well.

With about a week left of the 2018 legislative session, lawmakers are facing increased pressure to pass gun safety legislation—in response to last month’s mass school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas. But, the process is pitting people within the same parties against one another.

With no traction in the Florida House, a bill aiming to help those who say they survived abuse at the infamous Dozier school for Boys appears to be dead.

A number of public safety proposals have passed their first House committee, allowing them to now head to the floor. Like the Senate version bill, it does not include an assault weapons ban. Still, more people are starting to agree that while this isn’t the best bill, it’s not totally bad either.

Some gun safety proposals passed their first Florida Senate committee without an assault weapons ban. While top GOP lawmakers are calling the effort bipartisan, some Democrats pushing for more gun reforms disagree.

Following last week’s mass school shooting, about 100 Parkland students are expected to come to Tallahassee this week to speak to Florida lawmakers about gun control. It comes just as an NRA-backed bill was withdrawn from consideration. But, some may see the student’s gun control views as a bit “naive.”

In the wake of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting that left 17 people dead, politicians on the state and national level are weighing in on what can be done legislatively.

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