Sam Turken

After living in North Carolina the past four years, Miami native Sam Turken is back in the city he’s always called home.

Sam is a proud Miami Beach Senior High alum and a recent graduate of Duke University where he studied journalism, public policy and history. He caught the public radio bug three years ago when he covered a gun buyback in Miami while on his spring break. Since then, he’s produced audio pieces on race, social justice and public housing. He enjoys using sound to tell rich and intimate stories.

A former managing editor of The Duke Chronicle, Sam has digital experience covering a range of other topics. He’s investigated the absence of female managers in Duke men’s basketball program and reported on enrollment imbalances within public schools in Durham, N.C. He’s also interned with WBUR in Boston and Fusion, written for the Raleigh News & Observer and worked for the Duke Reporters’ Lab.

When Sam isn’t doing journalism things, he enjoys the outdoors. He runs, plays tennis and soccer and spends time around the bay and ocean—something he wasn’t able to do while in college. You may also spot him riding his bike around Miami’s streets.

People experiencing homelessness in Miami now have access to a new bathroom after the city  opened on Wednesday its first permanent toilet in Downtown. 

WLRN interns spent some time this summer looking at how the idea of gender is changing in South Florida. This story is part of their project.

Teenagers often spend their afternoons at the West Palm Beach Police Athletic League playing sports, watching movies and using computers.

But on one Monday afternoon in July, a group of middle and high school boys did something different. They participated in a discussion about rape and how not to objectify women.

A Broward County school board member says a recent comment she made about the 2017-18 school year was taken out of context. 

Parents of the victims of the Parkland school shooting claimed on Aug. 9 that board member Donna Korn recently said that last school year was the best Broward County has seen despite the massacre.

But in a release on Monday, Korn said soundbites of her statement from an interview during the State of the County address were cut short. She said her comment was actually praising the performance of Broward County's school principals. 

Over the past 20 years, a special team at the Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department has rushed around South Florida, preventing venomous snake bites from turning fatal. 

Young people are on their way to becoming a greater share of the electorate in wake of the Parkland school shooting, according to a new data analysis. 

The Democratic data firm TargetSmart found that the share of new registrations by people under 30 is up eight percent in Florida and two percent nationally since the Feb. 14 mass shooting. 

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida toured the Liberty Square public housing complex with local politicians Friday before meeting with more than a dozen Liberty City activists—some of whom have lost relatives to shootings.

The discussion focused on ways to reduce gun violence and improve housing and other opportunities in the area that has long been a hotbed for violence and poverty. 

South Florida residents are more at risk of injury and death from defective airbags than people in other parts of the country, according to federal transportation officials.

Florida also ranks third in unrepaired vehicles with faulty airbags from the Japanese maker Takata, with more than 1.4 million defective airbags still in use. That compounds the fact that the region's climate makes the airbags more unpredictable and dangerous, officials say. 

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings.