Sam Newlon

Sam Newlon interning as a WUSF/USF Zimmerman School digital news reporter for spring 2018.

Born and raised in San Antonio, Fla., Sam attended the University of Alabama before transferring to the University of South Florida to pursue a career in journalism. He is currently a junior who covers USF athletic programs as a staff writer for The Oracle, USF’s student newspaper.

Sam would like to become a sportswriter for a major sports media network and is interested in filmmaking. 

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri spoke at a press conference Tuesday to update the public about a recent controversial "stand your ground" case.

The news conference was supposed to include representatives from The Upper Pinellas County Ministerial Alliance and NAACP Clearwater, but they called before the event saying they would not attend. Gualtieri addressed the media alone.

Prescribed burns are a part of precautions taken throughout Florida to prevent massive forest fires by clearing flammable debris from the ground. They are meant to keep people safe, but one such burn was quite the opposite.

In the Panhandle town of Eastpoint, one of these burns grew out of control on June 24 and burnt down 36 homes. 

For the first time in Hillsborough County, a drug dealer will face murder charges after deputies said a man overdosed on an opioid that was sold to him.

In 2011, Gov. Rick Scott signed a law backed by the National Rifle Association that essentially stripped cities of their right to enact gun control regulations.

Seven years and a wave of political activism later, St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman joins ten Florida cities suing the state in hopes to overturn the legislation.

Florida beachgoers often imagine a day on the water. Colorful umbrellas peppered across the sand, the sound of waves foaming as they crash onto the shore and the inescapable smell of saltwater nipping at your senses.

Sometimes, instead of this picturesque scene, a sickening odor of dead fish wafts across empty beaches, local restaurants are closed because they can’t prepare seafood, and residents even experience trouble breathing. The culprit is red tide.

No more computer models or projections. Finally – concrete data.

A scientific paper published in February may pave the way for a new conversation about rising sea levels using data instead of projections.