Rachel Martin

Kate Bowler's new memoir, Everything Happens for a Reason And Other Lies I've Loved, is a funny, intimate portrait of living in that nether space between life and death. In it, she shares her experiences with incurable stage 4 cancer and gives advice on what not to say to those who are terminally ill.

Bowler is also the host of Everything Happens, a new podcast.

Imagine having one of the worst days of your professional life play out in front of 5 million people.

ABC News anchor Dan Harris doesn't have to. In 2004, he had a panic attack on live TV after years of working in war zones and using drugs to cope with the stress. But that mortifying moment led him to take up meditation.

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You never know when the spirit is going to move the president to take questions from the press.

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Senator John McCain returns to work today despite his cancer diagnosis. His vote is needed. There are some big votes ahead today for both chambers of Congress.

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For the second time this year, David, one very outspoken Russian dissident is calling for mass demonstrations.

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Yeah. It's Alexei Navalny. He has organized what he calls anti-corruption protests.

In March, President Trump called opioid abuse in the U.S. "a total epidemic," and issued an executive order creating a commission focused on combating the opioid crisis.